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Math

Online TAKS Released Test: 2006  2002

(1) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student represents and uses numbers in a variety of equivalent forms. The student is expected to:

(A) compare and order integers and positive rational numbers;
(B) convert between fractions, decimals, whole numbers, and percents mentally, on paper, or with a calculator; and
(C) represent squares and square roots using geometric models.

Interactive Student
(A) Builder Ted (Level One)
(A) Equivalent Fractions
(A) Compare Fractions
(B) Rename Fractions
(B) Decimal to Fractions Concentration
(B) Sets of Numbers
(C) Square Root Flashcards

Interactive Classroom
(A) Real Number Line - Integers
(A) Real Number Line - Rational
(B) Percents and Ratios
(C) Square Root

(2) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student adds, subtracts, multiplies, or divides to solve problems and justify solutions. The student is expected to:

(A) represent multiplication and division situations involving fractions and decimals with  models, including concrete objects, pictures, words, and numbers;
(B) use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division to solve problems involving fractions and decimals;
(C) use models, such as concrete objects, pictorial models, and number lines, to add, subtract, multiply, and divide integers and connect the actions to algorithms;
(D) use division to find unit rates and ratios in proportional relationships such as speed, density, price, recipes, and student-teacher ratio;
(E) simplify numerical expressions involving order of operations and exponents;
(F) select and use appropriate operations to solve problems and justify the selections; and
(G) determine the reasonableness of a solution to a problem.

Interactive Student
(A) Exploring Multiplication/Division of Decimals
(A) Exploring Division of Fractions
(B) Find the Path
(B) Addition and Subtraction of Unlike Fractions
(B) Mystery Picture (Fractions)
(B) Soccer Shootout
(B) Multiply Fractions
(B) Divide Fractions
(B) EZ Fractions
(C) Modeling Subtraction of Integers
(E) Integer Guess
(E) Late Delivery
(E) Mystery Picture (Order of Operations)
(E) Mighty Math Astro Algebra
(E, G) Operation Order
(E) Order of Operations

Interactive Classroom
(A) Adding Real Numbers
(A, B) Dividing Fractions
(A) Division of Fractions
(B) Multiplication of Fractions
(B) Percents and Ratios
(B, D, F) Proportions
(A,B,C,D) Green Thumb Movie

(3) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student solves problems involving proportional relationships. The student is expected to:

(A) estimate and find solutions to application problems involving percent; and
(B) estimate and find solutions to application problems involving proportional relationships such as similarity, scaling, unit costs, and related measurement units.

 

 

(4) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student represents a relationship in numerical, geometric, verbal, and symbolic form. The student is expected to:

(A) generate formulas involving unit conversions, perimeter, area, circumference, volume, and scaling;
(B) graph data to demonstrate relationships in familiar concepts such as conversions, perimeter, area, circumference, volume, and scaling; and
(C) use words and symbols to describe the relationship between the terms in an arithmetic sequence with a fixed rate of change and their positions in the sequence

 

(A,B) Rectangular
(A,B) Cylinders, Circles, Cones
(A,B) Triangles, Pyramids
(A,B) Spheres
(A) Volume and Area
(A) Water Supply Movie

(5) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses equations to solve problems. The student is expected to:

(A) use concrete and pictorial models to solve equations and use symbols to record the actions; and
(B) formulate  problem situations when given a simple equation.

Interactive Student
(A) Solving One-Step Equations
(A) Exploring Two-Step Equations
(A) Equation Match
(A) Models and Like Terms
(B) Weighing the Wangdoodles

Interactive Classroom

(6) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student compares and classifies shapes and solids using geometric vocabulary and properties. The student is expected to:

(A) use angle measurements to classify pairs of angles as complementary or supplementary;
(B) use properties to classify triangles and quadrilaterals;
(C) use properties to classify three-dimensional figures, including pyramids, cones, prisms, and cylinders; and
(D) use critical attributes to define similarity.

Interactive Student
(A) Name That Angle
(B) Polygon Angle Sum
(B) Right Triangles
(C) Geo-Matho

Interactive Classroom
(A, B) Flexigons (Measure angles with protractors)
(B) Shadows
(B) Polypaint (Draw polygons/Measure sides and angles)

(7) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses coordinate geometry to describe location on a plane. The student is expected to:

(A) locate and name points on a coordinate plane using ordered pairs of integers; and
(B) graph translations on a coordinate plane.

Interactive Student
(A) What's the Point?
(A) Dancing Robot
(A) Bug Coordinates
(B) Transformations and Tangrams
(B) Coordinate Plane
 

Interactive Classroom
(A) Coordinate Planes
(A) Coordinates
(A, B) Shape and Space in Geometry
(A,B) Coordinate Systems Movies

(8) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses geometry to model and describe the physical world. The student is expected to:

(A) sketch three-dimensional figures when given the top, side, and front views;
(B) make a net (two-dimensional model) of the surface area of a three-dimensional figure; and
(C) use geometric concepts and properties to solve problems in fields such as art and architecture.

Interactive Student
(C) Plot Plan

Interactive Classroom 
(B) Comparing Nets and Solids
(C) Cutting Solid Figures

(9) Measurement. The student solves application problems involving estimation and measurement.

(A) estimate measurements and solve application problems involving length (including perimeter and circumference) and area of polygons and other shapes;
(B) connect models for volume of prisms (triangular and rectangular) and cylinders to formulas of prisms (triangular and rectangular) and cylinders; and
(C) estimate measurements and solve application problems involving volume of prisms (rectangular and triangular) and cylinders.

Interactive Student

(A) Area Explorer

(A) Sal's Sub Shop

Interactive Classroom
Geometry
Flexigons (Measurement with ruler and protractor)
Measurement
Estimator

(10) Probability and statistics. The student recognizes that a physical or mathematical model can be used to describe the experimental and theoretical probability of real-life events. The student is expected to:

(A) construct sample spaces for simple or composite experiments ; and
(B) find the approximate probability

Interactive Student
(A) Fish Tank

Interactive Classroom 

(11) Probability and statistics. The student understands that the way a set of data is displayed influences its interpretation. The student is expected to:

(A) select and use an appropriate representation for presenting collected data and justify the selection; and
(B) make inferences and convincing arguments based on an analysis of given or collected data.

Interactive Student
(A) Data Picker

(A) Coin Tossing
(A,B) Box Model Probibility

Interactive Classroom
(A) Make a Graph

(12) Probability and statistics. The student uses measures of central tendency and range to describe a set of data. The student is expected to:

(A) describe a set of data using mean, median, mode, and range; and
(B) choose among mean, median, mode, or range to describe a set of data and justify the choice for a particular situation.

Interactive Student
(A) Train Race
(A) Mean, Median, Mode
(A) Landmark Sharks

Interactive Classroom
(A) Statistics

(13) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student applies Grade 7 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences, investigations in other disciplines, and activities in and outside of school. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics;
(B) use a problem-solving model that incorporates understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness;
(C) select or develop an appropriate problem-solving strategy from a variety of different types, including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking, acting it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working backwards to solve a problem; and
(D) select tools such as real objects, manipulatives, paper/pencil, and technology or techniques such as mental math, estimation, and number sense to solve problems.

Interactive Student
(A)Stock Market
(B) Integer Guess
(B) Small Blueprinter
(B, C, D) Power Lines
(B, C, D) Guess the Number
(B, C, D) Guess the Number (Word Problems)

Interactive Classroom
(A,B,C,D) Math Playground

(14) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student communicates about Grade 7 mathematics through informal and mathematical language, representations, and models. The student is expected to:

(A) communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools, appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models; and
(B) evaluate the effectiveness of different representations to communicate ideas.

Interactive Student

(A) Logo Park
(A) Small Blueprinter

Interactive Classroom
(A) Make a Graph
(A, B) Circumference & Diameter

(15) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student uses logical reasoning to make conjectures and verify conclusions. The student is expected to:

(A) make conjectures from patterns or sets of examples and nonexamples; and
(B) validate his/her conclusions using mathematical properties and relationships.

(A) Golf Number Patterns

 

 

 

Science - Starting in school year 2010-2011

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(1) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student, for at least 40% of the instructional time, conducts laboratory and field investigations following safety procedures and environmentally appropriate and ethical practices. The student is expected to: (A) demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations as outlined in the Texas Safety Standards; and
(B) practice appropriate use and conservation of resources, including disposal, reuse, or recycling of materials.

Interactive Student
(A) Lab Safety Quiz - Quia
(A) Lab Safety
(A) Lab Safety Trivia Quiz
(A) Battleship Lab Safety
(B) Dumptown Game
(B) Salmon Challenge
(B) It's not all garbage

(B) Water Treatment

Interactive Classroom 

(2) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific inquiry methods during laboratory and field investigations. The student is expected to: (A) plan and implement comparative and descriptive investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, and using appropriate equipment and technology;
(B) design and implement experimental investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and using appropriate equipment and technology;
(C) collect and record data using the International System of Units (SI) and qualitative means such as labeled drawings, writing, and graphic organizers;
(D) construct tables and graphs, using repeated trials and means, to organize data and identify patterns; and
(E) analyze data to formulate reasonable explanations, communicate valid conclusions supported by the data, and predict trends.

Interactive Student

(A) It Takes A Lickin'
(B,C) Dolphin Game
(D) Kids Graphing Page
(D) Pie Chart

Interactive Classroom 
(D) Pie Chart

(D) Cool Graphing

(3) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving to make informed decisions and knows the contributions of relevant scientists. The student is expected to: (A) in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;
(B) use models to represent aspects of the natural world such as human body systems and plant and animal cells;
(C) identify advantages and limitations of models such as size, scale, properties, and materials; and
(D) relate the impact of research on scientific thought and society, including the history of science and contributions of scientists as related to the content.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(D) Amazon Interactive

(4) Science investigation and reasoning. The student knows how to use a variety of tools and safety equipment to conduct science inquiry. The student is expected to: (A) use appropriate tools to collect, record, and analyze information, including life science models, hand lens, stereoscopes, microscopes, beakers, Petri dishes, microscope slides, graduated cylinders, test tubes, meter sticks, metric rulers, metric tape measures, timing devices, hot plates, balances, thermometers, calculators, water test kits, computers, temperature and pH probes, collecting nets, insect traps, globes, digital cameras, journals/notebooks, and other equipment as needed to teach the curriculum; and
(B) use preventative safety equipment, including chemical splash goggles, aprons, and gloves, and be prepared to use emergency safety equipment, including an eye/face wash, a fire blanket, and a fire extinguisher.

Interactive Student
(A) Hair Detective
(A)Fish Dissection

Interactive Classroom

 

(5) Matter and energy. The student knows that interactions occur between matter and energy. The student is expected to: (A) recognize that radiant energy from the Sun is transformed into chemical energy through the process of photosynthesis;
(B) demonstrate and explain the cycling of matter within living systems such as in the decay of biomass in a compost bin; and
(C) diagram the flow of energy through living systems, including food chains, food webs, and energy pyramids.
   
(6) Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has physical and chemical properties and can undergo physical and chemical changes. The student is expected to (A) identify that organic compounds contain carbon and other elements such as hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, nitrogen, or sulfur;
(B) distinguish between physical and chemical changes in matter in the digestive system; and
(C) recognize how large molecules are broken down into smaller molecules such as carbohydrates can be broken down into sugars.
   
(7) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that there is a relationship among force, motion, and energy. The student is expected to: (A) contrast situations where work is done with different amounts of force to situations where no work is done such as moving a box with a ramp and without a ramp, or standing still;
(B) illustrate the transformation of energy within an organism such as the transfer from chemical energy to heat and thermal energy in digestion; and
(C) demonstrate and illustrate forces that affect motion in everyday life such as emergence of seedlings, turgor pressure, and geotropism.

Interactive Student
(A) Levers
(A) Simple Machines
(A) Simple Machine Quiz
(C) Shoot the Cannonball

Interactive Classroom
(A) Odd Machine
 

(8)  Earth and space. The student knows that natural events and human activity can impact Earth systems. The student is expected to

(A) predict and describe how different types of catastrophic events impact ecosystems such as floods, hurricanes, or tornadoes;
(B) analyze the effects of weathering, erosion, and deposition on the environment in ecoregions of Texas; and
(C) model the effects of human activity on groundwater and surface water in a watershed.

 Interactive Student
(A) Plate Tectonics

(A) Plate Tectonic Crossword
(A) Aim a Hurricane
(A) Make a Quake

(A) Create a Disaster click on small icons to choose tornado, volcano, hurricane or earthquake

Interactive Classroom
(A) Plate Tectonics
(A) Hurricanes
 

(9) Earth and space. The student knows components of our solar system. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the characteristics of objects in our solar system that allow life to exist such as the proximity of the Sun, presence of water, and composition of the atmosphere; and
(B) identify the accommodations, considering the characteristics of our solar system, that enabled manned space exploration.
(A) Your weight on other planets  
(10) Organisms and environments. The student knows that there is a relationship between organisms and the environment. The student is expected to: (A) observe and describe how different environments, including microhabitats in schoolyards and biomes, support different varieties of organisms;
(B) describe how biodiversity contributes to the sustainability of an ecosystem; and
(C) observe, record, and describe the role of ecological succession such as in a microhabitat of a garden with weeds.
(A, B, C) Water Life
(B) Quest to Nest
(B) EcoDefender
(B) Amazon Interactive
(11) Organisms and environments. The student knows that populations and species demonstrate variation and inherit many of their unique traits through gradual processes over many generations. The student is expected to: (A) examine organisms or their structures such as insects or leaves and use dichotomous keys for identification;
(B) explain variation within a population or species by comparing external features, behaviors, or physiology of organisms that enhance their survival such as migration, hibernation, or storage of food in a bulb; and
(C) identify some changes in genetic traits that have occurred over several generations through natural selection and selective breeding such as the Galapagos Medium Ground Finch (Geospiza fortis) or domestic animals.
   
(12) Organisms and environments. The student knows that living systems at all levels of organization demonstrate the complementary nature of structure and function. The student is expected to: (A) investigate and explain how internal structures of organisms have adaptations that allow specific functions such as gills in fish, hollow bones in birds, or xylem in plants;
(B) identify the main functions of the systems of the human organism, including the circulatory, respiratory, skeletal, muscular, digestive, excretory, reproductive, integumentary, nervous, and endocrine systems;
(C) recognize levels of organization in plants and animals, including cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and organisms;
(D) differentiate between structure and function in plant and animal cell organelles, including cell membrane, cell wall, nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondrion, chloroplast, and vacuole;
(E) compare the functions of a cell to the functions of organisms such as waste removal; and
(F) recognize that according to cell theory all organisms are composed of cells and cells carry on similar functions such as extracting energy from food to sustain life.

Interactive Student
(B) Build a Human Skeleton
(B) Skeleton - Interactive Body
(B) Muscles - Interactive Body
(B) Organs - Interactive Body
(B) Organ Systems
(B) Millionaire Game on the Brain

(B) Body System Quiz
(B) Body Parts & System Quiz
(B) Inner Body

(B) eSkeleton

(B) Build a Beast

(D) Frog Dissection  (demo, enter)
(D) Fish Dissection

 

Interactive Classroom
(B) Organ Systems
(B) Coronary Bypass Surgery Video

 

(13) Organisms and environments. The student knows that a living organism must be able to maintain balance in stable internal conditions in response to external and internal stimuli. The student is expected to: (A) investigate how organisms respond to external stimuli found in the environment such as phototropism and fight or flight; and
(B) describe and relate responses in organisms that may result from internal stimuli such as wilting in plants and fever or vomiting in animals that allow them to maintain balance.
   
(14) Organisms and environments. The student knows that reproduction is a characteristic of living organisms and that the instructions for traits are governed in the genetic material. The student is expected to: (A) define heredity as the passage of genetic instructions from one generation to the next generation;
(B) compare the results of uniform or diverse offspring from sexual reproduction or asexual reproduction; and
(C) recognize that inherited traits of individuals are governed in the genetic material found in the genes within chromosomes in the nucleus.

Interactive Student

(A) The Mighty Mutation Maker

(C) The Gene Machine
(C) Dog Breeding

(C) DNA Workshop Activity

Interactive Classroom
(C) Dominant Genes
(C) DNA & Proteins

 

 

Language Arts Beginning 2009

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Online TAAS Reading Released Test:  1999 2000 2001

(1)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to adjust fluency when reading aloud grade-level text based on the reading purpose and the nature of the text.

Interactive Student
 

Interactive Classroom 

(2)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A)  determine the meaning of grade-level academic English words derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes;
(B)  use context (within a sentence and in larger sections of text) to determine or clarify the meaning of unfamiliar or ambiguous words;
(C)  complete analogies that describe part to whole or whole to part;
(D)  identify the meaning of foreign words commonly used in written English with emphasis on Latin and Greek words (e.g., habeus corpus, e pluribus unum, bona fide, nemesis); and
(E)  use a dictionary, a glossary, or a thesaurus (printed or electronic) to determine the meanings, syllabication, pronunciations, alternate word choices, and parts of speech of words.

Interactive Student
Paint by Idioms
Eye on Idioms
(A) Root Word Puzzles

(A) Roots and Prefixes

(A) Rooting out Words

Interactive Classroom 
(E) Visuwords

(3)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  describe multiple themes in a work of fiction;
(B)  describe conventions in myths and epic tales (e.g., extended simile, the quest, the hero's tasks, circle stories); and
(C)  analyze how place and time influence the theme or message of a literary work.

Interactive Student
 

Interactive Classroom 

(4)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze the importance of graphical elements (e.g., capital letters, line length, word position) on the meaning of a poem.

 

 

(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain a playwright's use of dialogue and stage directions.

 

 

(6)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  explain the influence of the setting on plot development;
(B)  analyze the development of the plot through the internal and external responses of the characters, including their motivations and conflicts; and
(C)  analyze different forms of point of view, including first-person, third-person omniscient, and third-person limited.

Interactive Student

 Drama Map

Character Map

Conflict Map

Resolution Map

Setting Map
Plot Diagram

Interactive Classroom 

(7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to describe the structural and substantive differences between an autobiography or a diary and a fictional adaptation of it.

Interactive Student

Types of Text

Study Guides

 

(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to determine the figurative meaning of phrases and analyze how an author's use of language creates imagery, appeals to the senses, and suggests mood.

 

 

(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the difference between the theme of a literary work and the author's purpose in an expository text.

Interactive Student
 

Interactive Classroom 
 

(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  evaluate a summary of the original text for accuracy of the main ideas, supporting details, and overall meaning;
(B)  distinguish factual claims from commonplace assertions and opinions;
(C)  use different organizational patterns as guides for summarizing and forming an overview of different kinds of expository text; and
(D)  synthesize and make logical connections between ideas within a text and across two or three texts representing similar or different genres, and support those findings with textual evidence.

Interactive Student

 Compare and Contrast Map

Interactive Classroom

(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to:

(A)  analyze the structure of the central argument in contemporary policy speeches (e.g., argument by cause and effect, analogy, authority) and identify the different types of evidence used to support the argument; and
(B)  identify such rhetorical fallacies as ad hominem, exaggeration, stereotyping, or categorical claims in persuasive texts.

Interactive Student

 Compare and Contrast Map

 

(12)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow multi-dimensional instructions from text to complete a task, solve a problem, or perform procedures; and
(B)  explain the function of the graphical components of a text.

Interactive Student

(A,B) Types of Text

 

(13)  Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(A)  interpret both explicit and implicit messages in various forms of media;
(B)  interpret how visual and sound techniques (e.g., special effects, camera angles, lighting, music) influence the message;
(C)  evaluate various ways media influences and informs audiences; and
(D)  assess the correct level of formality and tone for successful participation in various digital media.

Interactive Student
 

Interactive Classroom 

(14)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
(B)  develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
(C)  revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
(E)  revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

Interactive Student
Story Mapping

Graphic Map
Myth Machine
Power Proofreading
Writing Skills

 

(15)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

 

(A)  write an imaginative story that:
  (i)  sustains reader interest;
  (ii)  includes well-paced action and an engaging story line;
  (iii)  creates a specific, believable setting through the use of sensory details;
  (iv)  develops interesting characters; and
  (v)  uses a range of literary strategies and devices to enhance the style and tone; and
(B)  write a poem using:
  (i)  poetic techniques (e.g., rhyme scheme, meter);
  (ii)  figurative language (e.g., personification, idioms, hyperbole); and
  (iii)  graphic elements (e.g., word position).

Interactive Student
(A) Story Creator

Interactive Classroom 

(16)  Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write a personal narrative that has a clearly defined focus and communicates the importance of or reasons for actions and/or consequences.

 

(A) write legibly by selecting cursive or manuscript as appropriate (4-8);

(B) capitalize and punctuate correctly to clarify and enhance meaning such as capitalizing titles, using hyphens, semicolons, colons, possessives, and sentence punctuation (6-8);

(C) write with accurate spelling of syllable constructions, including closed, open, consonant before -le, and syllable boundary patterns (3-6);

(D) write with accurate spelling of roots such as drink, speak, read, or happy, inflections such as those that change tense or number, suffixes such as -able or -less, and prefixes such as re- or un- (4-6);

(E) use resources to find correct spellings (4-8);

(F) spell accurately in final drafts (4-8); and

(G) understand the influence of other languages and cultures on the spelling of English words (6-8).

Interactive Student
 

Interactive Classroom 

(17)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

 

(A)  write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that:
  (i)  presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
  (ii)  contains a clearly stated purpose or controlling idea;
  (iii)  is logically organized with appropriate facts and details and includes no extraneous information or inconsistencies;
  (iv)  accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources; and
  (v)  uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs;
(B)  write a letter that reflects an opinion, registers a complaint, or requests information in a business or friendly context;
(C)  write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate the writing skills for multi-paragraph essays and provide sustained evidence from the text using quotations when appropriate; and
(D)  produce a multimedia presentation involving text and graphics using available technology.

Interactive Student
 

Interactive Classroom
 

(18)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write a persuasive essay to the appropriate audience that:

(A)  establishes a clear thesis or position;
(B)  considers and responds to the views of others and anticipates and answers reader concerns and counter-arguments; and
(C)  includes evidence that is logically organized to support the author's viewpoint and that differentiates between fact and opinion.

Interactive Student
(B) Persuasion Map
(D) Comic Creator
(F) Letter Generator

Interactive Classroom 

(19)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

 

(A)  identify, use, and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
  (i)  verbs (perfect and progressive tenses) and participles;
  (ii)  appositive phrases;
  (iii)  adverbial and adjectival phrases and clauses;
  (iv)  conjunctive adverbs (e.g., consequently, furthermore, indeed);
  (v)  prepositions and prepositional phrases and their influence on subject-verb agreement;
  (vi)  relative pronouns (e.g., whose, that, which);
  (vii)  subordinating conjunctions (e.g., because, since); and
  (viii)  transitions for sentence to sentence or paragraph to paragraph coherence;
(B)  write complex sentences and differentiate between main versus subordinate clauses; and
(C)  use a variety of complete sentences (e.g., simple, compound, complex) that include properly placed modifiers, correctly identified antecedents, parallel structures, and consistent tenses.

Interactive Student
Plurals

Verb Tense 5
Verb Tense 4
Verb Tense 3
Verb Tense 2
Verb Tense 1
Comma Splices
Fused Sentences
Fused Sentences-Comma Splices
Fused Sentences-Comma Splices
Fused Sentences-Comma Splices
Grammar Skills
Sentence Structure

 

(20)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:

(A)  use conventions of capitalization; and
(B)  recognize and use punctuation marks including:
  (i)  commas after introductory words, phrases, and clauses; and
  (ii)  semicolons, colons, and hyphens.

Interactive Student

 

(21)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and check correct spellings.

Interactive Student

Vocabulary Drill
Root Words
Rooting Out Words
Word Confusion

 

(22)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A)  brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate a major research question to address the major research topic; and
(B)  apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a wide variety of sources and create a written plan after preliminary research in reference works and additional text searches.

 

 

(23)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

 

(A)  follow the research plan to gather information from a range of relevant print and electronic sources using advanced search strategies;
(B)  categorize information thematically in order to see the larger constructs inherent in the information;
(C)  record bibliographic information (e.g., author, title, page number) for all notes and sources according to a standard format; and(D)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

 

 

(24)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to:

(A)  narrow or broaden the major research question, if necessary, based on further research and investigation; and
(B)  utilize elements that demonstrate the reliability and validity of the sources used (e.g., publication date, coverage, language, point of view) and explain why one source is more useful than another.

   
(25)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that:

(A)  draws conclusions and summarizes or paraphrases the findings in a systematic way;
(B)  marshals evidence to explain the topic and gives relevant reasons for conclusions;
(C)  presents the findings in a meaningful format; and
(D)  follows accepted formats for integrating quotations and citations into the written text to maintain a flow of ideas.

   
(26)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students will use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  listen to and interpret a speaker's purpose by explaining the content, evaluating the delivery of the presentation, and asking questions or making comments about the evidence that supports a speaker's claims;(B)  follow and give complex oral instructions to perform specific tasks, answer questions, or solve problems; and(C)  draw conclusions about the speaker's message by considering verbal communication (e.g., word choice, tone) and nonverbal cues (e.g., posture, gestures, facial expressions).

Interactive Student
Listening Skills

Listen to learn- Wolf and Crane
Listen to learn- The Kingdom of the Lion

Interactive Classroom
Listening Skills

(27)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to present a critique of a literary work, film, or dramatic production, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, a variety of natural gestures, and conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

 

(28)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate productively in discussions, plan agendas with clear goals and deadlines, set time limits for speakers, take notes, and vote on key issues.

 

 

Social Studies

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Online TAAS Release Test:  1999   2000   2001

(1) History. The student understands traditional historical points of reference in Texas history. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the major eras in Texas history and describe their defining characteristics;

(B) apply absolute and relative chronology through the sequencing of significant individuals, events, and time periods; and
(C) explain the significance of the following dates: 1519, 1718, 1821, 1836, 1845, and 1861.

 

 

(2) History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues prior to the Texas Revolution shaped the history of Texas. The student is expected to:

(A) compare the cultures of Native Americans in Texas prior to European colonization;

(B) identify important individuals, events, and issues related to European exploration and colonization of Texas, including the establishment of Catholic missions;
(C) identify the contributions of significant individuals including Moses Austin, Stephen F. Austin, and Juan Seguín during the colonization of Texas;
(D) identify the impact of the Mexican federal Constitution of 1824 on events in Texas;
(E) trace the development of events that led to the Texas Revolution, including the Law of April 6, 1830, the Turtle Bayou Resolutions, and the arrest of Stephen F. Austin; and
(F) contrast Spanish and Anglo purposes for and methods of settlement in Texas.

(A) Clovis Time Machine

 

(3) History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues related to the Texas Revolution shaped the history of Texas. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the roles played by significant individuals during the Texas Revolution, including George Childress, Lorenzo de Zavala, James Fannin, Sam Houston, Antonio López de Santa Anna, and William B. Travis; and

(B) explain the issues surrounding significant events of the Texas Revolution, including the battle of Gonzales, the siege of the Alamo, the convention of 1836, Fannin's surrender at Goliad, and the battle of San Jacinto.

Interactive Student

 

Interactive Classroom
(B) Alamo Video

(4) History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues shaped the history of the Republic of Texas and early Texas statehood. The student is expected to:

(A) identify individuals, events, and issues during the Republic of Texas and early Texas statehood, including annexation, Sam Houston, Anson Jones, Mirabeau B. Lamar, problems of the Republic of Texas, the Texas Rangers, the Mexican War, and the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo; and

(B) analyze the causes of and events leading to Texas statehood.

 

 

(5) History. The student understands how events and issues shaped the history of Texas during the Civil War and Reconstruction. The student is expected to:

(A) explain reasons for the involvement of Texas in the Civil War; and

(B) analyze the political, economic, and social effects of the Civil War and Reconstruction in Texas.

 

 

(6) History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues shaped the history of Texas from Reconstruction through the beginning of the 20th century. The student is expected to:

(A) identify significant individuals, events, and issues from Reconstruction through the beginning of the 20th century, including the factors leading to the expansion of the Texas frontier, the effects of westward expansion on Native Americans, the development of the cattle industry from its Spanish beginnings, the myth and realities of the cowboy way of life, the effects of the growth of railroads, the buffalo soldiers, James Hogg, Cynthia Parker, and Spindletop; and

(B) explain the political, economic, and social impact of the cattle and oil industries and the development of West Texas resulting from the close of the frontier.

 

 

(7) History. The student understands how individuals, events, and issues shaped the history of Texas during the 20th century. The student is expected to:

(A) define the impact of "boom and bust" and trace the boom-and-bust cycle of leading Texas industries throughout the 20th century, including farming, oil and gas, cotton, cattle ranching, real estate, and banking;

(B) evaluate the Progressive and other reform movements in Texas in the 19th and 20th centuries;
(C) trace the civil rights and equal rights movements of various groups in Texas in the 20th century and identify key leaders in these movements, including James Farmer, Hector P. García, Oveta Culp Hobby, and Lyndon B. Johnson;
(D) analyze the political, economic, and social impact of major wars, including World War I and World War II, on the history of Texas;
(E) trace the emergence of the two-party system in Texas during the second half of the 20th century.

 

 

(8) Geography. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:

(A) create thematic maps, graphs, charts, models, and databases representing various aspects of Texas during the 19th and 20th centuries; and

(B) pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns in Texas during the 19th and 20th centuries.

 

 

(9) Geography. The student understands the location and characteristics of places and regions of Texas. The student is expected to:

(A) locate places and regions of importance in Texas during the 19th and 20th centuries;

(B) compare places and regions of Texas in terms of physical and human characteristics; and
(C) analyze the effects of physical and human factors such as climate, weather, landforms, irrigation, transportation, and communication on major events in Texas.

(A) Beyond History Map

 

(10) Geography. The student understands the effects of the interaction between humans and the environment in Texas during the 19th and 20th centuries. The student is expected to:

(A) identify ways in which Texans have adapted to and modified the environment and analyze the consequences of the modifications; and

(B) explain ways in which geographic factors have affected the political, economic, and social development of Texas.

 

 

(11) Geography. The student understands the characteristics, distribution, and migration of population in Texas in the 19th and 20th centuries. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze why immigrant groups came to Texas and where they settled;

(B) analyze how immigration and migration to Texas in the 19th and 20th centuries have influenced Texas;
(C) analyze the effects of the changing population distribution in Texas during the 20th century; and
(D) describe the structure of the population of Texas using demographic concepts such as growth rate and age distribution.

 

 

(12) Economics. The student understands the factors that caused Texas to change from an agrarian to an urban society. The student is expected to:

(A) explain economic factors that led to the urbanization of Texas;

(B) trace the development of major industries that contributed to the urbanization of Texas; and
(C) explain the changes in the types of jobs and occupations that have resulted from the urbanization of Texas.

 

 

(13) Economics. The student understands the interdependence of the Texas economy with the United States and the world. The student is expected to:

(A) analyze the impact of national and international markets and events on the production of goods and services in Texas;

(B) analyze the impact of economic phenomena within the free enterprise system such as supply and demand, profit, government regulation, and world competition on the economy of Texas; and
(C) analyze the impact of significant industries in Texas such as oil and gas, aerospace, and medical technology on local, national, and international markets.

 

 

(14) Government. The student understands the basic principles reflected in the Texas Constitution. The student is expected to:

(A) identify how the Texas Constitution reflects the principles of limited government, checks and balances, federalism, separation of powers, popular sovereignty, and individual rights; and

(B) identify the influence of ideas from the U.S. Constitution on the Texas Constitution.

 

 

(15) Government. The student understands the structure and functions of government created by the Texas Constitution. The student is expected to:

(A) describe the structure and functions of government at municipal, county, and state levels;
(B) identify major sources of revenue for state and local governments; and
(C) describe the structure and governance of Texas public education

 

 

(16) Citizenship. The student understands the rights and responsibilities of Texas citizens. The student is expected to:

(A) summarize the rights guaranteed in the Texas Bill of Rights; and

(B) identify civic responsibilities of Texas citizens.

 

 

(17) Citizenship. The student understands the importance of the expression of different points of view in a democratic society. The student is expected to:

(A) identify different points of view of political parties and interest groups on important Texas issues;

(B) describe the importance of free speech and press in a democratic society; and
(C) express and defend a point of view on an issue of historical or contemporary interest in Texas.

 

 

(18) Citizenship. The student understands the importance of effective leadership in a democratic society. The student is expected to:

(A) identify the leadership qualities of elected and appointed leaders of Texas, past and present, including Texans who have been President of the United States; and

(B) analyze the contributions of Texas leaders such as Henry B. González, Phil Gramm, Barbara Jordan, and Sam Rayburn.

 

 

(19) Culture. The student understands the concept of diversity within unity in Texas. The student is expected to:

(A) explain how the diversity of Texas is reflected in a variety of cultural activities, celebrations, and performances;

(B) describe how people from selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups attempt to maintain their cultural heritage while adapting to the larger Texas culture; and
(C) identify examples of Spanish influence on place names such as Amarillo and Río Grande and on vocabulary in Texas, including words that originated from the Spanish cattle industry.

 

 

(20) Science, technology, and society. The student understands the impact of scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the political, economic, and social development of Texas. The student is expected to:

(A) compare types and uses of technology, past and present;

(B) identify Texas leaders in science and technology such as Roy Bedichek, Walter Cunningham, Michael DeBakey, and C.M. "Dad" Joiner;
(C) analyze the effects of scientific discoveries and technological innovations, such as barbed wire, the windmill, and oil, gas, and aerospace industries, on the developments of Texas;
(D) evaluate the effects of scientific discoveries and technological innovations on the use of resources such as fossil fuels, water, and land;
(E) analyze how scientific discoveries and technological innovations have resulted in an interdependence among Texas, the United States, and the world; and
(F) make predictions about economic, social, and environmental consequences that may result from future scientific discoveries and technological innovations.

 

 

(21) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as computer software, databases, media and news services, biographies, interviews, and artifacts to acquire information about Texas;

(B) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;
(C) organize and interpret information from outlines, reports, databases, and visuals including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps;
(D) identify points of view from the historical context surrounding an event and the frame of reference that influenced the participants;
(E) support a point of view on a social studies issue or event;
(F) identify bias in written, oral, and visual material;
(G) evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author; and
(H) use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

Interactive Student
(B) Texas Ranch House

(C) Texas Quiz

Interactive Classroom

(22) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A) use social studies terminology correctly;
(B) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation;
(C) transfer information from one medium to another, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using computer software as appropriate; and
(D) create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information.

 

 

(23) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and
(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.

Interactive Student

(B) Amazon Interactive

Interactive Classroom

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updated 02/21/2012