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Math

Online TAKS Released Test 2006  2004  2003

6.1 Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student represents and uses rational numbers in a variety of equivalent forms. 

(A) compare and order non-negative rational numbers;
(B) generate equivalent forms of rational numbers including whole numbers, fractions, and decimals;
(C) use integers to represent real-life situations;
(D) write prime factorizations using exponents; and
(E) identify factors of a positive integer, common factors , and the greatest common factor of a set of positive integers; and
(F) identify multiples of a positive integer and common multiples and the least common multiple of a set of positive integers

Interactive Student
(A) Inequality Flashcards
(A) Builder Ted
(A) Guess The Number
(A) Compare Fractions
(A) Zero's and Ones
(A) Compare Fractions
(B) Rename Fractions
(B) Fraction Fireworks
(B) Match Equivalent Fractions
(B) Number Heroes
(B) Fresh Baked Fractions
(B) Uncovering Equivalent Fractions
(B) Decimal to Fractions Concentration
(B) Equivalent Ratio Concentration
(B) Equivalent Decimals Concentration
(B) Equivalent Fraction Concentration
(B) Dirt Bike Tug of War
(B) Find Grampy

Interactive Classroom
(B) Modeling Equivalent Fractions
(B) Fraction Decimal Conversion

(6.2) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student adds, subtracts, multiplies, and divides to solve problems and justify solutions.

The student is expected to:
(A) model addition and subtraction situations involving fractions with objects, pictures, words, and numbers;
(B) use addition and subtraction to solve problems involving fractions and decimals;
(C) use multiplication and division of whole numbers to solve problems including situations involving equivalent ratios and rates;
(D) estimate and round to approximate reasonable results and to solve problems where exact answers are not required; and
(E) use order of operations to simplify whole number expressions (without exponents) in problem solving situations

Interactive Student
(A) Ice Cream Fractions
(B) Change Maker
(B) EZ Fractions
(C) Multiplication Concentration
(C) Multiplication Hidden Picture
(C) Multiplication Matho
(C) Math Baseball
(C) Guess and Check
(C) Written Multiplication

Interactive Classroom 
(B) Adding Real Numbers
(B) Sums and Differences with Decimals
(D) Estimator
 

(6.3) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student solves problems involving proportional relationships. 

(A) use ratios to describe proportional situations;
(B) represent ratios and percents with concrete models, fractions, and decimals; and
(C) use ratios to make predictions in proportional situations.

Interactive Student
(A,B) Ratios

(B) Equivalent Ratio Concentration
(B) Tony Fractions Pizza Game
(B) Mervin's Make a Match

Interactive Classroom

(A,B) Similar Figures
(B) Comparing Fractions Using Number Lines
(B) Comparing Fractions Using Vertical Number Lines
(B) Create A Pie Chart

(6.4) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses letters as variables in mathematical expressions to describe how one quantity changes when a related quantity changes.

The student is expected to:
(A) use tables and symbols to represent and describe proportional and other relationships such as those  involving conversions, arithmetic sequences, perimeter, and area, and
(B) use tables of data to generate formulas representing relationships involving perimeter, area, volume of a rectangular prism, etc.

Interactive Student

(B) Area of A Rectangle
(B) Perimeter of a Rectangle

Interactive Classroom
(B) Area and Perimeter

(6.5) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses letters to represent an unknown in an equation.

The student is expected to formulate  equations from problem situations described by linear relationships

Interactive Student
Weighing the Wangdoodles
Proportional Marbles
Amazing Mundo

Interactive Classroom
 

(6.6) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses geometric vocabulary to describe angles, polygons, and circles.

(A) use angle measurements to classify angles as acute, obtuse, or right;
(B) identify relationships involving angles in triangles and quadrilaterals; and
(C) describe the relationship between radius, diameter, and circumference of a circle.

Interactive Student
(A) Name That Angle
(A) Wiseup Angles
(A) Introduction to Angles - Matching
(A) Introduction to Angles - Flashcards
(A) Introduction to Angles - Concentration
(A) Introduction to Angles - Word Search
(A) Robo Angles
(B) Right Triangles

(B) Bicycle Design Video
(B,C) Logo Park
(B) Parallelogram Conditions
(C) Circle Ratio

Interactive Classroom
(A) Introduction to Angles
(B) Shadows

(6.7) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses coordinate geometry to identify location in two dimensions. 

locate and name points on a coordinate plane using ordered pairs of non-negative rational numbers.

Interactive Student
What's the Point
Looking for the Top Quark
Bug Coordinates

Interactive Classroom
Cosmic Geometry
 

(6.8) Measurement. The student solves application problems involving estimation and measurement of length, area, time, temperature, capacity, weight, and angles. 

(A) estimate measurements and evaluate reasonableness of results;
(B) select and use appropriate units, tools, or formulas to measure and to solve problems involving length (including perimeter), area, time, temperature, volume, and weight;
(C) measure angles; and
(D) convert measures within the same measurement system (customary and metric) based on relationships between units.

Interactive Student
(A, D) Sal's Sub Shop

(B) Measure It!
(B) Shape Surveyor
(B) Area Explorer

(B) Snap/Don't Snap

(B) Calculating time
(B) Calculating Area
(B) Zoo Designer
(C) Bathroom Tiles
(C) Banana Hunt
(C) Angles
(C) Star Gazing
(C) Clown Clear-Up
(D) Soda Game
(D) Equivalent Metric Concentration
(D) Equivalent Measures Concentration

Interactive Classroom
(A, B, D) Animal Weigh In
(D) Customary Measurement

(6.9) Probability and statistics. The student uses experimental and theoretical probability to make predictions. 

 (A) construct sample spaces using lists, tree diagrams and
(B) find the probabilities of a simple event and its complement and describe the relationship between the two.

Interactive Student
(B) Probably a Favorite | (in Spanish)
(B) Designing Dolls Video
(B) Coin Tossing

Interactive Classroom
(B) Fish Tank
(B) Popcorn, Peanuts and Hot Dogs Movie

(6.10) Probability and statistics. The student uses statistical representations to analyze data.

 

(A) select and use an appropriate representation for presenting and displaying different graphical representations of the same data  including line plot, line graph, bar graph, and stem and leaf plot ;
(B) identify mean (using concrete objects and pictorial models) median, mode, and range of data;
(C) sketch circle graphs to display data; and
(D) solve problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting data.

Interactive Student
(A, C) Create A Graph
(B) Train Race
(B) Landmark Sharks

Interactive Classroom
(A)(C) Create A Graph
(A)(C) Create A Pie Chart
(B) Train Race
(C)(D) Data Picking

(6.11) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student applies Grade 6 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences, investigations in other disciplines, and activities in and outside of school.

The student is expected to:
(A) identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics;
(B) use a problem-solving model that incorporates understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness;
(C) select or develop an appropriate problem-solving strategy from a variety of different types, including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking, acting it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working backwards to solve a problem; and
(D) select tools such as real objects, manipulatives, paper/pencil, and technology or techniques such as mental math, estimation, and number sense to solve problems.

Interactive Student
(A) Math Olympics
(B, C, D) Power Lines
(B, C, D) Fox, Chicken, Corn
(B) Small Blueprinter
(B) Math Baseball- Algebra Style
(B) Guess and Check

Interactive Classroom
(D) Popcorn, Peanuts and Hot Dogs Movie
(D) Geometry Toolbox

(6.12) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student communicates about Grade 6 mathematics through informal and mathematical language, representations, and models.

The student is expected to:
(A) communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools, appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models; and
(B) evaluate the effectiveness of different representations to communicate ideas.

Interactive Student
(A) Logo Park

(A) Small Blueprinter

Interactive Classroom
(B) Multimedia Math Glossary 

(6.13) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student uses logical reasoning to make conjectures and verify conclusions.

The student is expected to:
(A) make conjectures from patterns or sets of examples and nonexamples; and
(B) validate his/her conclusions using mathematical properties and relationships.

 

 

Science - Starting in school year 2010-2011

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(1) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student, for at least 40% of instructional time, conducts laboratory and field investigations following safety procedures and environmentally appropriate and ethical practices. The student is expected to: (A) demonstrate safe practices during laboratory and field investigations as outlined in the Texas Safety Standards; and
(B) practice appropriate use and conservation of resources, including disposal, reuse, or recycling of materials.
Interactive Student
(A) Lab Safety Quiz - Quia
(A) Lab Safety
(A) Lab Safety Trivia Quiz
(A) Battleship Lab Safety
(B) Dumptown Game
(B) Recycling Survey 
(B) Word Search
(B) It's not all garbage
 
Interactive Classroom
(2) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific inquiry methods during laboratory and field investigations. The student is expected to: (A) plan and implement comparative and descriptive investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, and using appropriate equipment and technology;
(B) design and implement experimental investigations by making observations, asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and using appropriate equipment and technology;
(C) collect and record data using the International System of Units (SI) and qualitative means such as labeled drawings, writing, and graphic organizers;
(D) construct tables and graphs, using repeated trials and means, to organize data and identify patterns; and
(E) analyze data to formulate reasonable explanations, communicate valid conclusions supported by the data, and predict trends.
Interactive Student
(A) Scientific Method
(C) Hair Detective
(D) Kids Graphing Page
(B) Dolphins in Depth
Interactive Classroom
(A,B,C,D) Green Thumb Movie
(3) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses critical thinking, scientific reasoning, and problem solving to make informed decisions and knows the contributions of relevant scientists. The student is expected to: (A) in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;
(B) use models to represent aspects of the natural world such as a model of Earth's layers;
(C) identify advantages and limitations of models such as size, scale, properties, and materials; and
(D) relate the impact of research on scientific thought and society, including the history of science and contributions of scientists as related to the content.
Interactive Student Interactive Classroom
(4) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows how to use a variety of tools and safety equipment to conduct science inquiry. The student is expected to: (A) use appropriate tools to collect, record, and analyze information, including journals/notebooks, beakers, Petri dishes, meter sticks, graduated cylinders, hot plates, test tubes, triple beam balances, microscopes, thermometers, calculators, computers, timing devices, and other equipment as needed to teach the curriculum; and
(B) use preventative safety equipment, including chemical splash goggles, aprons, and gloves, and be prepared to use emergency safety equipment, including an eye/face wash, a fire blanket, and a fire extinguisher.
Interactive Student
(A) Virtual Scanning Electron Microscopy
(A) The World Within: Powers of Ten
(A) 3-D Cell
(A) Cell Cycle
(A) Animal Cell Mitosis
Interactive Classroom
(A) How Big?
(5) Matter and energy. The student knows the differences between elements and compounds. The student is expected to: (A) know that an element is a pure substance represented by chemical symbols;
(B) recognize that a limited number of the many known elements comprise the largest portion of solid Earth, living matter, oceans, and the atmosphere;
(C) differentiate between elements and compounds on the most basic level; and
(D) identify the formation of a new substance by using the evidence of a possible chemical change such as production of a gas, change in temperature, production of a precipitate, or color change.
Interactive Student
(A) Physical Changes
(A) ALIENS Juice Bar
(D) Kitchen Chemistry
 
Interactive Classroom
(6) Matter and energy. The student knows matter has physical properties that can be used for classification. The student is expected to: (A) compare metals, nonmetals, and metalloids using physical properties such as luster, conductivity, or malleability;
(B) calculate density to identify an unknown substance; and
(C) test the physical properties of minerals, including hardness, color, luster, and streak.
Interactive Student
(B) Mass, Volume, Density- Density Lab
(C) MasterMines
Interactive Classroom

 
(7) Matter and energy. The student knows that some of Earth's energy resources are available on a nearly perpetual basis, while others can be renewed over a relatively short period of time. Some energy resources, once depleted, are essentially nonrenewable. The student is expected to: (A) research and debate the advantages and disadvantages of using coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear power, biomass, wind, hydropower, geothermal, and solar resources; and
(B) design a logical plan to manage energy resources in the home, school, or community.

 
Interactive Student
(A) Energy City
Interactive Classroom
(8) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows force and motion are related to potential and kinetic energy. The student is expected to: (A) compare and contrast potential and kinetic energy;
(B) identify and describe the changes in position, direction, and speed of an object when acted upon by unbalanced forces;
(C) calculate average speed using distance and time measurements;
(D) measure and graph changes in motion; and
(E) investigate how inclined planes and pulleys can be used to change the amount of force to move an object.
Interactive Student
(B) Funderstanding Roller Coaster
(B) Speed, Eggs and Slam

(E) Simple Machines
(B) Coaster Creator
(E) Compound Machines

Interactive Classroom
(B) Gravity
 
(9) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that the Law of Conservation of Energy states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed, it just changes form. The student is expected to: (A) investigate methods of thermal energy transfer, including conduction, convection, and radiation;
(B) verify through investigations that thermal energy moves in a predictable pattern from warmer to cooler until all the substances attain the same temperature such as an ice cube melting; and
(C) demonstrate energy transformations such as energy in a flashlight battery changes from chemical energy to electrical energy to light energy.
Interactive Student
(A) Too hot to handle
Interactive Classroom
(10) Earth and space. The student understands the structure of Earth, the rock cycle, and plate tectonics. The student is expected to: (A) build a model to illustrate the structural layers of Earth, including the inner core, outer core, mantle, crust, asthenosphere, and lithosphere;
(B) classify rocks as metamorphic, igneous, or sedimentary by the processes of their formation;
(C) identify the major tectonic plates, including Eurasian, African, Indo-Australian, Pacific, North American, and South American; and
(D) describe how plate tectonics causes major geological events such as ocean basins, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and mountain building.
Interactive Student
(B) Classifying Rocks
(B) The Rock Cycle
(C)(D) Java Game
Interactive Classroom
(C) Pangaea
(D) The Earth 25 Million Years Ago
(D) Parts & Types of Volcanoes
(D) Build a Volcano
(D) Crusty Stuff
(D) Volcano Explorer
(11) Earth and space. The student understands the organization of our solar system and the relationships among the various bodies that comprise it. The student is expected to: (A) describe the physical properties, locations, and movements of the Sun, planets, Galilean moons, meteors, asteroids, and comets;
(B) understand that gravity is the force that governs the motion of our solar system; and
(C) describe the history and future of space exploration, including the types of equipment and transportation needed for space travel.
Interactive Student
(A) How Much Would You Weigh?
(A) How Old Would You Be?
(A) Connect the Stars
(A) Catch a Planet
(C) Design a Space Station
(C) Cosmic Quest
Interactive Classroom
(A) Parts of the Solar System
(A) Shoot the Cannonball
(A) Name That Planet!
 
(12) Organisms and environments. The student knows all organisms are classified into Domains and Kingdoms. Organisms within these taxonomic groups share similar characteristics which allow them to interact with the living and nonliving parts of their ecosystem. The student is expected to: (A) understand that all organisms are composed of one or more cells;
(B) recognize that the presence of a nucleus determines whether a cell is prokaryotic or eukaryotic;
(C) recognize that the broadest taxonomic classification of living organisms is divided into currently recognized Domains;
(D) identify the basic characteristics of organisms, including prokaryotic or eukaryotic, unicellular or multicellular, autotrophic or heterotrophic, and mode of reproduction, that further classify them in the currently recognized Kingdoms;
(E) describe biotic and abiotic parts of an ecosystem in which organisms interact; and
(F) diagram the levels of organization within an ecosystem, including organism, population, community, and ecosystem.
Interactive Student Interactive Classroom

 

 

 

Language Arts Beginning 2009

 

Online TAKS Released Test  2004   2003

(1)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to adjust fluency when reading aloud grade-level text based on the reading purpose and the nature of the text.

   

(2)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A)  determine the meaning of grade-level academic English words derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes;
(B)  use context (e.g., cause and effect or compare and contrast organizational text structures) to determine or clarify the meaning of unfamiliar or multiple meaning words;
(C)  complete analogies that describe part to whole or whole to part (e.g., ink:pen as page: ____ or pen:ink as book: _____);
(D)  explain the meaning of foreign words and phrases commonly used in written English (e.g., RSVP, que sera sera); and
(E)  use a dictionary, a glossary, or a thesaurus (printed or electronic) to determine the meanings, syllabication, pronunciations, alternate word choices, and parts of speech of words.

(A) Match the Prefixes

(B) Paint by Idioms
(B) Eye on Idioms
(D) Rooting Out Words
(D) Flip Chips

(A, E) Roots and Prefixes - Matching
(A, E) Roots and Prefixes - Concentration
(A, E) Roots and Prefixes - Word Search

(B) Face Idioms
(B) Visuwords

(3)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  infer the implicit theme of a work of fiction, distinguishing theme from the topic;
(B)  analyze the function of stylistic elements (e.g., magic helper, rule of three) in traditional and classical literature from various cultures; and
(C)  compare and contrast the historical and cultural settings of two literary works.

   

(4)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain how figurative language (e.g., personification, metaphors, similes, hyperbole) contributes to the meaning of a poem.

   

(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the similarities and differences in the setting, characters, and plot of a play and those in a film based upon the same story line.

   

(6)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  summarize the elements of plot development (e.g., rising action, turning point, climax, falling action, denouement) in various works of fiction;
(B)  recognize dialect and conversational voice and explain how authors use dialect to convey character; and
(C)  describe different forms of point-of-view, including first- and third-person.

  (A) Reading Comprehension

(7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the literary language and devices used in memoirs and personal narratives and compare their characteristics with those of an autobiography.

   

(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain how authors create meaning through stylistic elements and figurative language emphasizing the use of personification, hyperbole, and refrains.

   

(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to compare and contrast the stated or implied purposes of different authors writing on the same topic.

   

(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  summarize the main ideas and supporting details in text, demonstrating an understanding that a summary does not include opinions;
(B)  explain whether facts included in an argument are used for or against an issue;
(C)  explain how different organizational patterns (e.g., proposition-and-support, problem-and-solution) develop the main idea and the author's viewpoint; and
(D)  synthesize and make logical connections between ideas within a text and across two or three texts representing similar or different genres.

(D) RainForest Identification  

(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast the structure and viewpoints of two different authors writing for the same purpose, noting the stated claim and supporting evidence; and
(B)  identify simply faulty reasoning used in persuasive texts.

(A) Persuasion Map  

(12)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow multi-tasked instructions to complete a task, solve a problem, or perform procedures; and
(B)  interpret factual, quantitative, or technical information presented in maps, charts, illustrations, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.

   

(13)  Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(A)  explain messages conveyed in various forms of media;
(B)  recognize how various techniques influence viewers' emotions;
(C)  critique persuasive techniques (e.g., testimonials, bandwagon appeal) used in media messages; and
(D)  analyze various digital media venues for levels of formality and informality.

   

(14)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
(B)  develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
(C)  revise drafts to clarify meaning, enhance style, include simple and compound sentences, and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and rearranging sentences or larger units of text after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
(E)  revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

(B) Compare and Contrast Map

(D) Capitalization and Punctuation
(D) Punctuation Campground
(D) Title Ball 
(D) Punctuation Paintball
(D) Word Confusion
(D) Spell Check

 

(15)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

(A)  write imaginative stories that include:
(i)  a clearly defined focus, plot, and point of view;
(ii)  a specific, believable setting created through the use of sensory details; and
(iii)  dialogue that develops the story; and
(B)  write poems using:
(i)  poetic techniques (e.g., alliteration, onomatopoeia);
(ii)  figurative language (e.g., similes, metaphors); and
(iii)  graphic elements (e.g., capital letters, line length).

(A) Plot Diagram
(Bi) Acrostic Poem
(A) Story Creator

 

 

 

(16)  Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write a personal narrative that has a clearly defined focus and communicates the importance of or reasons for actions and/or consequences.

   

(17)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  create multi-paragraph essays to convey information about a topic that:
(i)  present effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
(ii)  guide and inform the reader's understanding of key ideas and evidence;
(iii)  include specific facts, details, and examples in an appropriately organized structure; and
(iv)  use a variety of sentence structures and transitions to link paragraphs;
(B)  write informal letters that convey ideas, include important information, demonstrate a sense of closure, and use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing);
(C)  write responses to literary or expository texts and provide evidence from the text to demonstrate understanding; and
(D)  produce a multimedia presentation involving text and graphics using available technology.

(B) Letter Generator  

(18)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write persuasive essays for appropriate audiences that establish a position and include sound reasoning, detailed and relevant evidence, and consideration of alternatives.

   

(19)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
(i)  verbs (irregular verbs and active and passive voice);
(ii)  non-count nouns (e.g., rice, paper);
(iii)  predicate adjectives (She is intelligent.) and their comparative and superlative forms (e.g., many, more, most);
(iv)  conjunctive adverbs (e.g., consequently, furthermore, indeed);
(v)  prepositions and prepositional phrases to convey location, time, direction, or to provide details;
(vi)  indefinite pronouns (e.g., all, both, nothing, anything);
(vii)  subordinating conjunctions (e.g., while, because, although, if); and
(viii)  transitional words and phrases that demonstrate an understanding of the function of the transition related to the organization of the writing (e.g., on the contrary, in addition to);
(B)  differentiate between the active and passive voice and know how to use them both; and
(C)  use complete simple and compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.

(Ai) Monster Truck Verbs
(C) Sentence Sort
(Av) Prepositions
(C) Making Compound Sentences
 

(20)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:

(A)  use capitalization for:
(i)  abbreviations;
(ii)  initials and acronyms; and
(iii)  organizations;
(B)  recognize and use punctuation marks including:
(i)  commas in compound sentences;
(ii)  proper punctuation and spacing for quotations; and
(iii)  parentheses, brackets, and ellipses (to indicate omissions and interruptions or incomplete statements); and
(C)  use proper mechanics including italics and underlining for titles of books.

(A,B,C) Extreme Sentence Surgeons
(Bi) Going to work with Commas
 

(21)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:

(A)  differentiate between commonly confused terms (e.g., its, it's; affect, effect);
(B)  use spelling patterns and rules and print and electronic resources to determine and check correct spellings; and
(C)  know how to use the spell-check function in word processing while understanding its limitations.

   

(22)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A)  brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate open-ended questions to address the major research topic; and
(B)  generate a research plan for gathering relevant information about the major research question.

   

(23)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow the research plan to collect data from a range of print and electronic resources (e.g., reference texts, periodicals, web pages, online sources) and data from experts;
(B)  differentiate between primary and secondary sources;
(C)  record data, utilizing available technology (e.g., word processors) in order to see the relationships between ideas, and convert graphic/visual data (e.g., charts, diagrams, timelines) into written notes;
(D)  identify the source of notes (e.g., author, title, page number) and record bibliographic information concerning those sources according to a standard format; and
(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

   

(24)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to:

(A)  refine the major research question, if necessary, guided by the answers to a secondary set of questions; and
(B)  evaluate the relevance and reliability of sources for the research.

   

(25)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that:

(A)  compiles important information from multiple sources;
(B)  develops a topic sentence, summarizes findings, and uses evidence to support conclusions;
(C)  presents the findings in a consistent format; and
(D)  uses quotations to support ideas and an appropriate form of documentation to acknowledge sources (e.g., bibliography, works cited).


 
 

(26)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students will use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

 

(A)  listen to and interpret a speaker's messages (both verbal and nonverbal) and ask questions to clarify the speaker's purpose and perspective;
(B)  follow and give oral instructions that include multiple action steps; and
(C)  paraphrase the major ideas and supporting evidence in formal and informal presentations.

(C) Listen to learn- Wolf and Crane
(C) Listen to learn- The Kingdom of the Lion
(A,C) Listening Skills

(27)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to give an organized presentation with a specific point of view, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, natural gestures, and conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

   

(28)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in student-led discussions by eliciting and considering suggestions from other group members and by identifying points of agreement and disagreement.

   

 

Social Studies

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(1) History. The student understands that historical events influence contemporary events. The student is expected to:

(A) describe characteristics of selected contemporary societies such as Bosnia and Northern Ireland that resulted from historical events or factors such as invasion, conquests, colonization, immigration, and trade; and
(B) analyze the historical background of selected contemporary societies to evaluate relationships between past conflicts and current conditions.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(2) History. The student understands the contributions of individuals and groups from various cultures to selected historical and contemporary societies. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the significance of individuals or groups from selected societies, past and present; and
(B) describe the influence of individual and group achievement on selected historical or contemporary societies.

Interactive Student
 

Interactive Classroom

(A, B) Discovery School.com

(3) Geography. The student uses maps, globes, graphs, charts, models, and databases to answer geographic questions. The student is expected to:

(A) create thematic maps, graphs, charts, models, and databases depicting various aspects of world regions and countries such as population, disease, and economic activities;
(B) pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns for selected world regions and countries shown on maps, graphs, charts, models, and databases; and
(C) compare selected world regions and countries using data from maps, graphs, charts, databases, and models.

Interactive Student
(B) Geosense.net click "Sign in", fill in a name and password, click "Sign in", click "Play alone"
(B) African Country Facts

(B) World Atlas

(B) World Capitals
(B) Destination - Africa
(B) Conquer the Continents
(B) Clue Maps
(B, C) Mapping Our World
(B) Countries of ...  Europe, Africa, South America, Asia
(B) Continents Quiz

Interactive Classroom
(A) Identify the Country - Africa, Europe, Asia, South America, Central America & Caribbean, Middle East, Mexico, United States, Canada
(B) Valley of the Kings, Theban Necropolis

(4) Geography. The student understands the characteristics and relative locations of major historical and contemporary societies. The student is expected to:

(A) locate major historical and contemporary societies on maps and globes;
(B) identify and explain the geographic factors responsible for patterns of population in places and regions;
(C) explain ways in which human migration influences the character of places and regions; and
(D) identify and explain the geographic factors responsible for the location of economic activities in places and regions.

(A) HyperHistory Online

Discovery Atlas

(5) Geography. The student understands how geographic factors influence the economic development, political relationships, and policies of societies. The student is expected to:

(A) explain factors such as location, physical features, transportation corridors and barriers, and distribution of natural resources that influence the economic development and foreign policies of societies; and
(B) identify geographic factors that influence a society's ability to control territory and that shape the domestic and foreign policies of the society.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(6) Geography. The student understands the impact of physical processes on patterns in the environment. The student is expected to:

(A) describe and explain how physical processes such as erosion, ocean circulation, and earthquakes have resulted in physical patterns on Earth's surface;
(B) describe and explain the physical processes that produce renewable and nonrenewable natural resources such as fossil fuels, fertile soils, and timber; and
(C) analyze the effects of physical processes and the physical environment on humans.

Interactive Student

(A) IKAM (choose Landforms)
(B) Place the States

Interactive Classroom
(A) World Landforms

 

(7) Geography. The student understands the impact of interactions between people and the physical environment on the development of places and regions. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and analyze ways people have adapted to the physical environment in selected places and regions;
(B) identify and analyze ways people have modified the physical environment; and
(C) describe ways in which technology influences human capacity to modify the physical environment.

Interactive Student
(C) Walk Thru Time

Interactive Classroom

(8) Economics. The student understands the various ways in which people organize economic systems. The student is expected to:

(A) compare ways in which various societies organize the production and distribution of goods and services;
(B) identify and differentiate among traditional, market, and command economies in selected contemporary societies, including the benefits of the U.S. free enterprise system; and
(C) explain the impact of scarcity on international trade and economic interdependence among societies.

(C) Trade
(C) Milk It
 

(9) Economics. The student understands the role factors of production play in a society's economy. The student is expected to:

(A) describe ways in which factors of production (natural resources, labor, capital, and entrepreneurs) influence the economies of selected contemporary societies; and
(B) identify problems and issues that may arise when one or more of the factors of production is in relatively short supply.

(A, B) E-Commerce

(A, B) Supply and Demand

 

(10) Economics. The student understands categories of economic activities and the means used to measure a society's economic level. The student is expected to:

(A) define and give examples of primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary industries; and
(B) describe and measure levels of economic development using various indicators such as individual purchasing power, life expectancy, and literacy.

   

(11) Government. The student understands the concepts of limited governments, such as constitutional and democratic governments, and unlimited governments, such as totalitarian and nondemocratic governments. The student is expected to:

(A) describe characteristics of limited and unlimited governments;
(B) identify examples of limited and unlimited governments;
(C) identify reasons for limiting the power of government; and
(D) compare limited and unlimited governments.

   

(12) Government. The student understands alternative ways of organizing governments. The student is expected to:

(A) identify alternative ways of organizing governments such as rule by one, few, or many;
(B) identify examples of governments with rule by one, few, or many;
(C) identify historical origins of democratic forms of government; and
(D) compare how governments function in selected world societies such as China, Germany, India, and Russia.

   

(13) Citizenship. The student understands that the nature of citizenship varies among societies. The student is expected to:

(A) describe roles and responsibilities of citizens in selected contemporary societies including the United States;
(B) explain how opportunities for citizens to participate in and influence the political process vary among selected contemporary societies; and
(C) compare the role of citizens in the United States with the role of citizens from selected democratic and non-democratic contemporary societies.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(14) Citizenship. The student understands the relationship among individual rights, responsibilities, and freedoms in democratic societies. The student is expected to:

(A) identify and explain the importance of voluntary civic participation in democratic societies; and
(B) explain relationships among rights and responsibilities in democratic societies.

   

(15) Culture. The student understands the similarities and differences within and among cultures in different societies. The student is expected to:

(A) define the concepts of culture and culture region;
(B) describe some traits that define cultures;
(C) analyze the similarities and differences among selected world societies; and
(D) identify and explain examples of conflict and cooperation between and among cultures within selected societies such as Belgium, Canada, and Rwanda.

Interactive Student
(A,B) Don't Gross out the World
(B) Dress the Part
 

(16) Culture. The student understands that certain institutions are basic to all societies, but characteristics of these institutions may vary from one society to another. The student is expected to:

(A) identify institutions basic to all societies, including government, economic, educational, and religious institutions; and
(B) compare characteristics of institutions in selected contemporary societies.

   

(17) Culture. The student understands relationships that exist among world cultures. The student is expected to:

(A) explain aspects that link or separate cultures and societies;
(B) explain the impact of political boundaries that cut across culture regions;
(C) analyze how culture traits spread;
(D) explain why cultures borrow from each other;
(E) evaluate how cultural borrowing affects world cultures; and
(F) evaluate the consequences of improved communication among cultures.

   

(18) Culture. The student understands the relationship that exists between artistic, creative, and literary expressions and the societies that produce them. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the relationships that exist between societies and their architecture, art, music, and literature;
(B) relate ways in which contemporary expressions of culture have been influenced by the past;
(C) describe ways in which societal issues influence creative expressions; and
(D) identify examples of art, music, and literature that have transcended the boundaries of societies and convey universal themes.

Interactive Student
(A) Pyramid Builder

Interactive Classroom

(19) Culture. The student understands the relationships among religion, philosophy, and culture. The student is expected to:

(A) explain the relationship among religious ideas, philosophical ideas, and cultures; and
(B) explain the significance of religious holidays and observances such as Christmas and Easter, Ramadan, and Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah in selected contemporary societies.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(20) Science, technology, and society. The student understands the relationships among science and technology and political, economic, and social issues and events. The student is expected to:

(A) give examples of scientific discoveries and technological innovations, including the roles of scientists and inventors, that have transcended the boundaries of societies and have shaped the world;
(B) explain how resources, belief systems, economic factors, and political decisions have affected the use of technology from place to place, culture to culture, and society to society; and
(C) make predictions about future social, economic, and environmental consequences that may result from future scientific discoveries and technological innovations.

Interactive Student

Interactive Classroom

(21) Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. The student is expected to:

(A) differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; and artifacts to acquire information about selected world cultures;
(B) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;
(C) organize and interpret information from outlines, reports, databases, and visuals including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps;
(D) identify different points of view about an issue or topic;
(E) identify the elements of frame of reference that influenced participants in an event; and
(F) use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

Interactive Student

(A) Artifact Lab

Interactive Classroom

(C, E) Learning Adventures in Citizenship

(22) Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:

(A) use social studies terminology correctly;
(B) incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication;
(C) express ideas orally based on research and experiences;
(D) create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies; and
(E) use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.

Interactive Student

(A) Geography Quest

Interactive Classroom

(23) Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. The student is expected to:

(A) use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and
(B) use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.

Interactive Student

(B) Amazon Interactive

Interactive Classroom

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updated 02/06/2012