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Math

Online TAKS Released Test  2004   2003

(5.1) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student uses place value to represent whole numbers and decimals. 

(A) use place value to read, write, compare, and order whole numbers through  999,999,999,999; and 
(B) use place value to read, write, compare, and order decimals through the thousandths place. 

Interactive Student
(A) Comparing Big Numbers
(B) Builder Ted 

(B) Place Value Pirates

Interactive Teacher
 

(5.2) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student uses fractions in problem-solving situations.

(A) generate a fraction equivalent to a given fraction such as 1/2 and 3/6 or 4/12 and 1/3; 
(B) generate a mixed number equivalent to a given improper fraction or generate an improper fraction equivalent to a given mixed number;
(C) compare two fractional quantities in problem- solving situations using a variety of methods, including common denominators; and 
(D) use models to relate decimals to fractions that name tenths, hundredths, and thousandths. 

Interactive Student
(A) Fraction Fireworks
(A) Equivalent Fraction Concentration
(A) Equivalent Fraction Finder
(A,C) Ratio Stadium
(A,C) Fractions Side by Side
(A) Ratio Blaster
(C) Equivalent Ratio Concentration
(C) Dirt Bike Tug of War
(C) Find Grampy
(C) Compare Fractions
(C) EZ Fractions
(C) Dolphin Racing
(D) Decimal to Fractions Concentration
(D) Decimals on the Caribbean
(D) Decimal Squares

Interactive Teacher
(C) Rename Fractions
 

(5.3) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student adds, subtracts, multiplies, and divides to solve meaningful problems. 

(A) use addition and subtraction to solve problems involving whole numbers and decimals; 
(B) use multiplication to solve problems involving whole numbers (no more than three digits times two digits without technology); 
(C) use division to solve problems involving whole numbers (no more than two-digit divisors and three-digit dividends without technology) including interpreting the remainder within a given context; 
(D) identify common factors of a set of whole numbers; and 
(E) model situations using addition and/or subtraction involving fractions with like denominators using concrete objects, pictures, words, and numbers

Interactive Student
(A) Math Hoops

(A) Jet Ski Addition
(A) Island Chase Subtraction
(B) Tunnel Blaster - Multiply
(B) Matho

(B) Grand Prix Multiplication
(B) Multiplication Conveyor Belt
(B) Mental Multiplication
(B) Written Multiplication
(B) Bouncing Balls Multiplication
(C) Tunnel Blaster - Division
(C) Drag Race Division
(B,C) Math Hoops-Katie & Arlo
(A, B, C) Space Shuttle Launch
(C)  Drag Race Division
(C) Fridge Magnet Division

(D) Factor Game

(D) Math Line Factors

Interactive Teacher
 

(5.4) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student estimates to determine reasonable results.

use strategies, including rounding and compatible numbers to estimate solutions to addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division problems.

Interactive Student
(A) Equivalent Decimals Concentration
Match the equivalent decimals.

Interactive Teacher

(5.5) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student makes generalizations based on observed patterns and relationships. 

(A) describe the relationship between sets of data in graphic organizers such as lists, tables, charts, and diagrams and 
(B) identify prime and composite numbers using concrete objects, pictorial models and patterns in factor pairs. 

Interactive Student
(B) Equivalent Fraction Concentration

(B) Dirt Bike Proportions
(B) Ration Blaster
(B) Ratio Martian
(B) Prime Turkeys
(C) Prime or Composite Finder
Find the equivalent fraction model.

Interactive Teacher
(B) Equivalent Fraction Worksheets9, 9B, 15, 15b

(5.6) Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student describes relationships mathematically.

The student is expected to select from and use diagrams and equations such as y = 5 + 3 to represent meaningful problem situations. 

Interactive Student

(A) Power Lines

(A) Guess the Number

Interactive Teacher

(5.7) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student generates geometric definitions using critical attributes.

identify essential attributes including parallel, perpendicular, and congruent parts of two- and three-dimensional geometric figures

Interactive Student
 3-D Lab
Package Company
Polygon Sides
Geo-Matho

Interactive Teacher
Geometric Solid Tool
Inventing With Polygons Movie

(5.8) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student models transformations.

(A) sketch the results of translations, rotations, and reflections on a Quadrant I coordinate grid; and 
(B) identify the transformation that generates one figure from the other when given two congruent figures on a Quadrant I coordinate grid. 

Interactive Student
(A) Ladybug Mazes
(A) Tessellate
(A) RoboPacker

Interactive Teacher
(A) Ladybug Mazes

(5.9) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student recognizes the connection between ordered pairs of numbers and locations of points on a plane.

The student is expected to locate and name points on a coordinate grid using ordered pairs of whole numbers. 

Interactive Student
Hurkle
Bug Coordinates

Interactive Teacher

(5.10) Measurement. The student selects and uses appropriate units and procedures to measure volume.

(A) perform simple conversions within the same measurement system (SI (metric) or customary);
(B) connect models for perimeter, area, and volume with their respective formulas; and
(C) select and use appropriate units and formulas to measure length, perimeter, area, and volume

Interactive Student
(A) Build a Shed
(B)Can you Fill It?
(B) Pour to Score
(B) Area Explorer
(C) Calculate the Perimeter
(C) Calculate the Area
(C) Metric Gum Parlor|
(C) Calculating Area
(C) Zoo Designer

Interactive Teacher
(C) Area and perimeter

(5.11) Measurement. The student applies measurement concepts. The student measures time and temperature (in degrees Fahrenheit and Celsius).

(A) solve problems involving changes in temperature; and
(B) solve problems involving elapsed time.

Interactive Student

(B) Difference in Time

Interactive Teacher

(5.12) Probability and statistics. The student describes and predicts the results of a probability experiment.

(A) use fractions to describe the results of an experiment; and 
(B) use experimental results to make predictions. 
(C) list all possible outcomes of a probability experiment such as tossing a coin

Interactive Student
(A) Probably a Favorite
(A) Fish Tank
(C) Coin Tossing

Interactive Teacher
(B) Roll'em
(B) What are your chances?

(5.13) Probability and statistics. The student solves problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting sets of data.

(A) use tables of related number pairs to make line graphs; 
(B) describe characteristics of data presented in tables and graphs including median, mode, and range; and 
(C) graph a given set of data using an appropriate graphical representation such as a picture or line graph. 

Interactive Student
(A) Kids Graphing Page
(A) Data Grapher

Interactive Teacher
(C) Gere's Bike Shop
(B) Train Race
(C)  Data Picking

(5.14) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student applies Grade 5 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences and activities in and outside of school. 

(A) identify the mathematics in everyday situations; 
(B) solve problems that incorporate understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness; 
(C) select or develop an appropriate problem- solving strategy, including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking, acting it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working backwards to solve a problem; and 
(D) use tools such as real objects, manipulatives, and technology to solve problems. 

Interactive Student
(A) Tens of Word Problems
(B) Power Lines
(B) Guess and Check
(C,D) Fox, Chicken, Corn
(B,D) Small Blue Printer
(B,C) Math Olympics

Interactive Teacher
(D) Geometry Toolbox

(5.15) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student communicates about Grade 5 mathematics using informal language.

(A) explain and record observations using objects, words, pictures, numbers, and technology; and 
(B) relate informal language to mathematical language and symbols. 

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher
(B) Multimedia Math Glossary

(5.16) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student uses logical reasoning

(A) make generalizations from patterns or sets of examples and nonexamples; and 
(B) justify why an answer is reasonable and explain the solution process. 

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

 

Science- Starting in school year 2010-2011

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(1) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student conducts classroom and outdoor investigations following home and school safety procedures and environmentally appropriate and ethical practices. The student is expected to: (A) demonstrate safe practices and the use of safety equipment as described in the Texas Safety Standards during classroom and outdoor investigations; and
(B) make informed choices in the conservation, disposal, and recycling of materials.
Interactive Student
(B) Dumptown Game
(B) Recycling Survey 
(B) Word Search
(B) It's not all garbage
(B) Clean Sweep USA
(B) Energyville
Interactive Teacher
(B) What's wrong with this picture
(2) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific methods during laboratory and outdoor investigations. The student is expected to: (A) describe, plan, and implement simple experimental investigations testing one variable;
(B) ask well-defined questions, formulate testable hypotheses, and select and use appropriate equipment and technology;
(C) collect information by detailed observations and accurate measuring;
(D) analyze and interpret information to construct reasonable explanations from direct (observable) and indirect (inferred) evidence;
(E) demonstrate that repeated investigations may increase the reliability of results;
(F) communicate valid conclusions in both written and verbal forms; and
(G) construct appropriate simple graphs, tables, maps, and charts using technology, including computers, to organize, examine, and evaluate information.
Interactive Student
(C)Dolphins in Depth
(C) Reaction Time
(G)Kids Graphing Page
(G)Graphing Hobbies
(G) Pie Chart Graphing
Interactive Teacher
(A,B,C,D)Green Thumb Movie
(G)Pie Chart
(3) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses critical thinking and scientific problem solving to make informed decisions. The student is expected to: (A) in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;
(B) evaluate the accuracy of the information related to promotional materials for products and services such as nutritional labels;
(C) draw or develop a model that represents how something works or looks that cannot be seen such as how a soda dispensing machine works; and
(D) connect grade-level appropriate science concepts with the history of science, science careers, and contributions of scientists.
Interactive Student

 

Interactive Teacher
(D)Biographical Dictionary
(4) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows how to use a variety of tools and methods to conduct science inquiry. The student is expected to: (A) collect, record, and analyze information using tools, including calculators, microscopes, cameras, computers, hand lenses, metric rulers, Celsius thermometers, prisms, mirrors, pan balances, triple beam balances, spring scales, graduated cylinders, beakers, hot plates, meter sticks, magnets, collecting nets, and notebooks; timing devices, including clocks and stopwatches; and materials to support observations of habitats or organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and
(B) use safety equipment, including safety goggles and gloves.
Interactive Student
(A) Virtual Scanning Electron Microscopy
(A) Hair Detective
(A) Reaction Time
Interactive Teacher
(5) Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has measurable physical properties and those properties determine how matter is classified, changed, and used. The student is expected to: (A) classify matter based on physical properties, including mass, magnetism, physical state (solid, liquid, and gas), relative density (sinking and floating), solubility in water, and the ability to conduct or insulate thermal energy or electric energy;
(B) identify the boiling and freezing/melting points of water on the Celsius scale;
(C) demonstrate that some mixtures maintain physical properties of their ingredients such as iron filings and sand; and
(D) identify changes that can occur in the physical properties of the ingredients of solutions such as dissolving salt in water or adding lemon juice to water
Interactive Student
(A)(B) Changes in State
(A) Changing State
 
Interactive Teacher
(6) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that energy occurs in many forms and can be observed in cycles, patterns, and systems. The student is expected to: (A) explore the uses of energy, including mechanical, light, thermal, electrical, and sound energy;
(B) demonstrate that the flow of electricity in circuits requires a complete path through which an electric current can pass and can produce light, heat, and sound;
(C) demonstrate that light travels in a straight line until it strikes an object or travels through one medium to another and demonstrate that light can be reflected such as the use of mirrors or other shiny surfaces and refracted such as the appearance of an object when observed through water; and
(D) design an experiment that tests the effect of force on an object.
Interactive Student
(A,B) Electrical Conductors
(B) Changing Circuits
(B) Getting Connected - Circuits
Interactive Teacher
(7) Earth and space. The student knows Earth's surface is constantly changing and consists of useful resources. The student is expected to (A) explore the processes that led to the formation of sedimentary rocks and fossil fuels;
(B) recognize how landforms such as deltas, canyons, and sand dunes are the result of changes to Earth's surface by wind, water, and ice;
(C) identify alternative energy resources such as wind, solar, hydroelectric, geothermal, and biofuels; and
(D) identify fossils as evidence of past living organisms and the nature of the environments at the time using models.
Interactive Student
(C) Energy City
(B) Landform Detectives
Interactive Teacher
(B) Landforms
(B) World Landforms
(8) Earth and space. The student knows that there are recognizable patterns in the natural world and among the Sun, Earth, and Moon system. The student is expected to: (A) differentiate between weather and climate;
(B) explain how the Sun and the ocean interact in the water cycle;
(C) demonstrate that Earth rotates on its axis once approximately every 24 hours causing the day/night cycle and the apparent movement of the Sun across the sky; and
(D) identify and compare the physical characteristics of the Sun, Earth, and Moon.
Interactive Student
(C) Earth, Sun, Moon
Interactive Teacher
(9) Organisms and environments. The student knows that there are relationships, systems, and cycles within environments. The student is expected to: (A) observe the way organisms live and survive in their ecosystem by interacting with the living and non-living elements;
(B) describe how the flow of energy derived from the Sun, used by producers to create their own food, is transferred through a food chain and food web to consumers and decomposers;
(C) predict the effects of changes in ecosystems caused by living organisms, including humans, such as the overpopulation of grazers or the building of highways; and
(D) identify the significance of the carbon dioxide-oxygen cycle to the survival of plants and animals.
Interactive Student
(A) Rain Forests
(A,B) Secrets @ Sea
(A,C) Water Life
(C) Quest to Nest
(C) EcoDefenders
Interactive Teacher
(10) Organisms and environments. The student knows that organisms undergo similar life processes and have structures that help them survive within their environments. The student is expected to: (A) compare the structures and functions of different species that help them live and survive such as hooves on prairie animals or webbed feet in aquatic animals;
(B) differentiate between inherited traits of plants and animals such as spines on a cactus or shape of a beak and learned behaviors such as an animal learning tricks or a child riding a bicycle; and
(C) describe the differences between complete and incomplete metamorphosis of insects.
Interactive Student
(A) Virtual Roach
(A) Animal Adaptations
Interactive Teacher

 

Language Arts After 2009

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(1)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level stories with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

Interactive Student
Reading Comprehension
Interactive Teacher

(2)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A)  determine the meaning of grade-level academic English words derived from Latin, Greek, or other linguistic roots and affixes;
(B)  use context (e.g., in-sentence restatement) to determine or clarify the meaning of unfamiliar or multiple meaning words;
(C)  produce analogies with known antonyms and synonyms;
(D)  identify and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and other sayings; and
(E)  use a dictionary, a glossary, or a thesaurus (printed or electronic) to determine the meanings, syllabication, pronunciations, alternate word choices, and parts of speech of words.

Interactive Student
(C) Word Frog
(C) Furious Frogs (multi-player)
(C) Synonym Sam's Lab
(E) VisuWords
Interactive Teacher

(3)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  compare and contrast the themes or moral lessons of several works of fiction from various cultures;
(B)  describe the phenomena explained in origin myths from various cultures; and
(C)  explain the effect of a historical event or movement on the theme of a work of literature.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(4)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze how poets use sound effects (e.g., alliteration, internal rhyme, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme) to reinforce meaning in poems.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to analyze the similarities and differences between an original text and its dramatic adaptation.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(6)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  describe incidents that advance the story or novel, explaining how each incident gives rise to or foreshadows future events;
(B)  explain the roles and functions of characters in various plots, including their relationships and conflicts; and
(C)  explain different forms of third-person points of view in stories.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the literary language and devices used in biographies and autobiographies, including how authors present major events in a person's life.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to evaluate the impact of sensory details, imagery, and figurative language in literary text.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading. Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time and summarize or paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g., generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks).

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to draw conclusions from the information presented by an author and evaluate how well the author's purpose was achieved.

Interactive Student
Think Bio Cube
Interactive Teacher

(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  summarize the main ideas and supporting details in a text in ways that maintain meaning and logical order
(B)  determine the facts in text and verify them through established methods;
(C)  analyze how the organizational pattern of a text (e.g., cause-and-effect, compare-and-contrast, sequential order, logical order, classification schemes) influences the relationships among the ideas;
(D)  use multiple text features and graphics to gain an overview of the contents of text and to locate information; and
(E)  synthesize and make logical connections between ideas within a text and across two or three texts representing similar or different genres.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(12)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify the author's viewpoint or position and explain the basic relationships among ideas (e.g., parallelism, comparison, causality) in the argument; and
(B)  recognize exaggerated, contradictory, or misleading statements in text.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(13)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:

(A)  interpret details from procedural text to complete a task, solve a problem, or perform procedures; and
(B)  interpret factual or quantitative information presented in maps, charts, illustrations, graphs, timelines, tables, and diagrams.

(B) It's a matter of time Interactive Teacher

(14)  Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(A)  explain how messages conveyed in various forms of media are presented differently (e.g., documentaries, online information, televised news);
(B)  consider the difference in techniques used in media (e.g., commercials, documentaries, news);
(C)  identify the point of view of media presentations; and
(D)  analyze various digital media venues for levels of formality and informality.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(15)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
(B)  develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
(C)  revise drafts to clarify meaning, enhance style, include simple and compound sentences, and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and rearranging sentences or larger units of text after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
(E)  revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

Interactive Student
(C) Making Compound Sentences
Interactive Teacher

(16)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

(A)  write imaginative stories that include:
(i)  a clearly defined focus, plot, and point of view;
(ii)  a specific, believable setting created through the use of sensory details; and
(iii)  dialogue that develops the story; and
(B)  write poems using:
(i)  poetic techniques (e.g., alliteration, onomatopoeia);
(ii)  figurative language (e.g., similes, metaphors); and
(iii)  graphic elements (e.g., capital letters, line length).

Interactive Student
(A) Story Creator
Interactive Teacher

(17)  Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write a personal narrative that conveys thoughts and feelings about an experience.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(18)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  create multi-paragraph essays to convey information about the topic that:
(i)  present effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
(ii)  guide and inform the reader's understanding of key ideas and evidence;
(iii)  include specific facts, details, and examples in an appropriately organized structure; and
(iv)  use a variety of sentence structures and transitions to link paragraphs;
(B)  write formal and informal letters that convey ideas, include important information, demonstrate a sense of closure, and use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing); and
(C)  write responses to literary or expository texts and provide evidence from the text to demonstrate understanding.

Interactive Student
(Aiv) What is a Sentence?
Interactive Teacher
(19)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write persuasive essays for appropriate audiences that establish a position and include sound reasoning, detailed and relevant evidence, and consideration of alternatives.
Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(20)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
(i)  verbs (irregular verbs and active voice);
(ii)  collective nouns (e.g., class, public);
(iii)  adjectives (e.g., descriptive, including origins: French windows, American cars) and their comparative and superlative forms (e.g., good, better, best);
(iv)  adverbs (e.g., frequency: usually, sometimes; intensity: almost, a lot);
(v)  prepositions and prepositional phrases to convey location, time, direction, or to provide details;
(vi)  indefinite pronouns (e.g., all, both, nothing, anything);
(vii)  subordinating conjunctions (e.g., while, because, although, if); and
(viii)  transitional words (e.g., also, therefore);
(B)  use the complete subject and the complete predicate in a sentence; and
(C)  use complete simple and compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.

Interactive Student
(B) Make a Sentence
Interactive Teacher

(21)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:

(A)  use capitalization for:
(i)  abbreviations;
(ii)  initials and acronyms; and
(iii)  organizations;
(B)  recognize and use punctuation marks including:
(i)  commas in compound sentences; and
(ii)  proper punctuation and spacing for quotations; and
(C)  use proper mechanics including italics and underlining for titles and emphasis

Interactive Student
(i) Comma Practice
(A,B,C) Extreme Sentence Surgeons
Interactive Teacher

(22)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:

(A)  spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules:
(i)  consonant changes (e.g.,/t/ to/sh/ in select, selection;/k/ to/sh/ in music, musician);
(ii)  vowel changes (e.g., long to short in crime, criminal; long to schwa in define, definition; short to schwa in legality, legal); and
(iii)  silent and sounded consonants (e.g., haste, hasten; sign, signal; condemn, condemnation);
(B)  spell words with:
(i)  Greek Roots (e.g., tele, photo, graph, meter);
(ii)  Latin Roots (e.g., spec, scrib, rupt, port, ject, dict);
(iii)  Greek suffixes (e.g., -ology, -phobia, -ism, -ist); and
(iv)  Latin derived suffixes (e.g., -able, -ible; -ance, -ence);
(C)  differentiate between commonly confused terms (e.g., its, it's; affect, effect);
(D)  use spelling patterns and rules and print and electronic resources to determine and check correct spellings; and
(E)  know how to use the spell-check function in word processing while understanding its limitations.

Interactive Student
(A) Everglades Spelling
(D) The sounds of English
Interactive Teacher

(23)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A)  brainstorm, consult with others, decide upon a topic, and formulate open-ended questions to address the major research topic; and
(B)  generate a research plan for gathering relevant information about the major research question.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(24)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow the research plan to collect data from a range of print and electronic resources (e.g., reference texts, periodicals, web pages, online sources) and data from experts;
(B)  differentiate between primary and secondary sources;
(C)  record data, utilizing available technology (e.g., word processors) in order to see the relationships between ideas, and convert graphic/visual data (e.g., charts, diagrams, timelines) into written notes;
(D)  identify the source of notes (e.g., author, title, page number) and record bibliographic information concerning those sources according to a standard format; and
(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(25)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to:

(A)  refine the major research question, if necessary, guided by the answers to a secondary set of questions; and
(B)  evaluate the relevance, validity, and reliability of sources for the research.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(26)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to synthesize the research into a written or an oral presentation that:

(A)  compiles important information from multiple sources;
(B)  develops a topic sentence, summarizes findings, and uses evidence to support conclusions;
(C)  presents the findings in a consistent format; and
(D)  uses quotations to support ideas and an appropriate form of documentation to acknowledge sources (e.g., bibliography, works cited).

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher
(27)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to

(A)  listen to and interpret a speaker's messages (both verbal and nonverbal) and ask questions to clarify the speaker's purpose or perspective;
(B)  follow, restate, and give oral instructions that include multiple action steps; and
(C)  determine both main and supporting ideas in the speaker's message.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(28)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to give organized presentations employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, natural gestures, and conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

(29)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in student-led discussions by eliciting and considering suggestions from other group members and by identifying points of agreement and disagreement.

Interactive Student Interactive Teacher

Social Studies

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(5.1) History. The student understands the causes and effects of European colonization in the United States.

(A)  explain when, where, and why groups of people colonized and settled in the United States; and

(B)  describe the accomplishments of significant colonial leaders such as Anne Hutchinson, William Penn, John Smith, and Roger Williams.

Interactive Student
(A) Jamestown Online Adventure

(A) Age of Exploration
(A) Early North American Colonies
(A) On the trail of John Smith

Interactive Teacher
(A) Growth of a Nation

(5.2)  History. The student understands how conflict between the American colonies and Great Britain led to American independence. 

(A)  identify the contributions of significant individuals during the revolutionary period, including Thomas Jefferson and George Washington;
(B)  analyze the causes and effects of events prior to and during the American Revolution such as the Boston Tea Party; and

(C)  summarize the results of the American Revolution, including the establishment of the United States and the origins of U.S. military institutions.

Interactive Student
(A) The Ride of Paul Revere

Interactive Teacher
(A) Famous Moments in Early American History Movies

(5.3)  History. The student understands the events that led from the Articles of Confederation to the creation of the U.S. Constitution and the government it established.

(A)  identify the contributions of individuals including James Madison and Roger Sherman who helped create the U.S. Constitution; and 
(B)  summarize the events that led to the creation of the U.S. Constitution.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.4)  History. The student understands political, economic, and social changes that occurred in the United States during the 19th century. 

(A)  identify changes in society resulting from the Industrial Revolution and explain how these changes led to conflict among sections of the United States; 
(B)  identify reasons people moved west;
 
(C)  identify examples of U.S. territorial expansion;
 
(D)  describe the causes and effects of the Civil War;
 
(E)  explain the reasons for and rights provided by the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments to the U.S. Constitution;
 
(F)  explain how industry and the mechanization of agriculture changed the American way of life; and
 
(G)  identify the challenges, opportunities, and contributions of people from selected Native-American and immigrant groups.

Interactive Student
(B) Lewis and Clark
(B) Growth of a Nation
(B) The California Goldrush
 

Interactive Teacher
(C) The Louisiana Purchase and Beyond
(G) New Americans

(5.5)  History. The student understands important issues, events, and individuals of the 20th century in the United States. 

(A)  analyze various issues and events of the 20th century such as urbanization, industrialization, increased use of oil and gas, world wars, and the Great Depression; and

(B)  identify the accomplishments of notable individuals such as Carrie Chapman Catt, Dwight Eisenhower, Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, Colin Powell, and Franklin D. Roosevelt who have made contributions to society in the areas of civil rights, women's rights, military actions, and politics.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.6)  Geography. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. 

(A)  apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps; and

(B)  translate geographic data into a variety of formats such as raw data to graphs and maps.

Interactive Student

(A) Landscapes

Interactive Teacher

(5.7)  Geography. The student understands the concept of regions. 

(A)  describe a variety of regions in the United States such as political, population, and economic regions that result from patterns of human activity;

(B)  describe a variety of regions in the United States such as landform, climate, and vegetation regions that result from physical characteristics; and

(C)  locate the fifty states on a map and identify regions such as New England and the Great Plains made up of various groups of states.

Interactive Student
(C) Name That State
(C) USA Quiz
(C) Where is That?
(C) States Web Games
(C) United States Map
(C) State Information Quiz
(C) Map Skills-U.S. map
(C) Conquer the States
(C) States of the US quiz

Interactive Teacher
(C) Xpedition Atlas

(5.8)  Geography. The student understands the location and patterns of settlement and the geographic factors that influence where people live.

(A)  identify and describe the types of settlement and patterns of land use in the United States;

(B)  describe clusters of settlement in the United States and explain their distribution;

(C)  analyze the location of cities in the United States, including capital cities, and explain their distribution, past and present; and

(D)  explain the geographic factors that influence patterns of settlement and the distribution of population in the United States, past and present.

Interactive Student
(C) Maps Stats

Interactive Teacher

(A) Growth of a Nation

(5.9)  Geography. The student understands how people adapt to and modify their environment. 

(A)  describe ways people have adapted to and modified their environment in the United States, past and present;

(B)  identify reasons why people have adapted to and modified their environment in the United States, past and present, such as the use of human resources to meet basic needs; and

(C)  analyze the consequences of human modification of the environment in the United States, past and present.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.10)  Economics. The student understands the basic economic patterns of early societies in the United States. 

(A)  explain the economic patterns of various early Native-American groups in the United States; and

(B)  explain the economic patterns of early European colonists.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.11)  Economics. The student understands the reasons for exploration and colonization. 

(A)  identify the economic motivations for European exploration and settlement in the United States; and

(B)  identify major industries of colonial America.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.12)  Economics. The student understands the characteristics and benefits of the free enterprise system in the United States. 

(A)  describe the development of the free enterprise system in colonial America and the United States;

(B)  describe how the free enterprise system works in the United States; and

(C)  give examples of the benefits of the free enterprise system in the United States.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.13)  Economics. The student understands the impact of supply and demand on consumers and producers in a free enterprise system. 

(A)  explain how supply and demand affects consumers in the United States; and

(B)  evaluate the effects of supply and demand on business, industry, and agriculture, including the plantation system, in the United States

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.14)  Economics. The student understands patterns of work and economic activities in the United States. 

(A)  analyze how people in different parts of the United States earn a living, past and present;

(B)  identify and explain how geographic factors have influenced the location of economic activities in the United States;

(C)  analyze the effects of immigration, migration, and limited resources on the economic development and growth of the United States;

(D)  describe the impact of mass production, specialization, and division of labor on the economic growth of the United States;

(E)  analyze how developments in transportation and communication have influenced economic activities in the United States; and

(F)  explain the impact of American ideas about progress and equality of opportunity on the economic development and growth of the United States.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.15)  Government. The student understands how people organized governments in colonial America. 

(A)  compare the systems of government of early European colonists; and

(B)  identify examples of representative government in the American colonies, including the Mayflower Compact and the Virginia House of Burgesses.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.16)  Government. The student understands important ideas in the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution. 

(A)  identify the purposes and explain the importance of the Declaration of Independence; and

(B)  explain the purposes of the U.S. Constitution as identified in the Preamble to the Constitution.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(A) Declaration of Independence Movie

(5.17)  Government. The student understands the framework of government created by the U.S. Constitution

(A)  identify and explain the basic functions of the three branches of government;

(B)  identify the reasons for and describe the system of checks and balances outlined in the U.S. Constitution; and

(C)  distinguish between national and state governments and compare their responsibilities in the U.S. federal system

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.18)  Citizenship. The student understands important customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent American beliefs and principles and contribute to our national identity. 

(A)  explain selected patriotic symbols and landmarks such as the Statue of Liberty and the White House and political symbols such as the donkey and elephant;

(B)  sing or recite The Star-Spangled Banner and explain its history;

(C)  recite and explain the meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance; and

(D)  describe the origins and significance of national celebrations such as Memorial Day, Labor Day, and Columbus Day.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.19)  Citizenship. The student understands the importance of individual participation in the democratic process. 

(A)  explain how individuals can participate in civic affairs and political parties at the national level;

(B)  analyze the role of the individual in national elections;

(C)  identify significant individuals such as César Chávez and Benjamin Franklin who modeled active participation in the democratic process; and

(D)  explain how to contact elected and appointed leaders in the national governments.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.20)  Citizenship. The student understands the importance of effective leadership in a democratic society.

(A)  identify leaders in the national governments, including the president and selected members of Congress, and their political parties; and

(B)  identify and compare leadership qualities of national leaders, past and present.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.21)  Citizenship. The student understands the fundamental rights of American citizens guaranteed in the Bill of Rights and other amendments to the U.S. Constitution. 

(A)  summarize the reasons for the creation of the Bill of Rights;

(B)  describe important individual rights including freedom of religion, speech, and press and the right to assemble and petition the government;

(C)  describe important due process rights including trial by jury and the right to an attorney; and

(D)  summarize selected amendments to the U.S. Constitution such as those that extended voting rights of U.S. citizens.

Interactive Student
(C) Save the Bill of Rights

Interactive Teacher
(A) Life without the Bill of Rights

(5.22)  Culture. The student understands the relationship between the arts and the times during which they were created.

(A)  identify significant examples of art, music, and literature from various periods in U.S. history; and

(B)  explain how examples of art, music, and literature reflect the times during which they were created.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.23)  Culture. The student understands the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to the United States. 

(A)  identify the similarities and differences within and among selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the United States;

(B)  describe customs, celebrations, and traditions of selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the United States; and

(C)  summarize the contributions of people of selected racial, ethnic, and religious groups to our national identity.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.24)  Science, technology, and society. The student understands the impact of science and technology on life in the United States. 

(A)  describe the contributions of famous inventors and scientists such as Neil Armstrong, John J. Audubon, Benjamin Banneker, Clarence Birdseye, George Washington Carver, Thomas Edison, and Carl Sagan;

(B)  identify how scientific discoveries and technological innovations such as the transcontinental railroad, the discovery of oil, and the rapid growth of technology industries have advanced the economic development of the United States;

(C)  explain how scientific discoveries and technological innovations in the fields of medicine, communication, and transportation have benefited individuals and society in the United States;

(D)  analyze environmental changes brought about by scientific discoveries and technological innovations such as air conditioning and fertilizers; and

(E)  predict how future scientific discoveries and technological innovations could affect life in the United States.

Interactive Student
(A) Edison Bio

Interactive Teacher

(5.25)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology. 

(A)  differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas;

(B)  analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions;

(C)  organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps;

(D)  identify different points of view about an issue or topic;

(E)  identify the elements of frame of reference that influenced the participants in an event; and

(F)  use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.26)  Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms.

(A)  use social studies terminology correctly;

(B)  incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication;

(C)  express ideas orally based on research and experiences;

(D)  create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies; and

(E)  use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5.27)  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings. 

(A)  use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and

(B)  use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.

Interactive Student
(B) Ways of Knowing Trail

Interactive Teacher

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updated 02/06/2012