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Math

Released TAKS Tests :  2006  2004    2003

(3.1)Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student uses place value to communicate about increasingly large whole numbers in verbal and written form, including money. 

(A) use place value to read, write (in symbols and words), and describe the value of whole numbers through 999,999; 
(B) use place value to compare and order whole numbers through 9,999; and 
(C) determine the value of a collection of coins and bills. 

Interactive Student 
(B) Number Top It
(C) Counting Change
(C) Counting Change II
(C) Concentration Game
(C) Spending Spree
(A) Base Blocks

(C) Counting Money

Interactive Teacher 
(A) Place Values to Millions
(C) Flashcards for Counting Money

(3.2)Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student uses fraction names and symbols to describe fractional parts of whole objects or sets of objects.

(A) construct concrete models of fractions; 
(B) compare fractional parts of whole objects or sets of objects in a problem situation using concrete models; 
(C) use fraction names and symbols to describe fractional parts of whole objects or sets of objects with denominators of 12 or less; and 
(D) construct concrete models of equivalent fractions for fractional parts of whole objects. 

Interactive Student
(A) Beginning Fractions

(A) Fraction Flags
(A,B,C) Fractions of Something

(B) Falling Leaves
(B) Equivalent Fraction Concentration

(B) Dolphin Racing
(B)(C)  Pizza Party
(B,C) Tony Fraction's Pizza Game
(B,C) Square Cookies
(B,C) Fractions Side by Side
(D) Matching Game 
(D) Mission Magnetite
(D) Fraction Methods

Interactive Teacher
(A,B,C,D,E) Green Thumbs Movie
(A,B) Fractions Study Jam
(B) Comparing and Ordering Fractions
(C) Who Wants Pizza
(C) Parts of a Whole

(3.3)Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student adds and subtracts to solve meaningful problems involving whole numbers.

(A) model addition and subtraction using pictures, words, and numbers; and 
(B) select addition or subtraction and use the operation to solve problems involving whole numbers through 999. 

Interactive Student
(A) Kids Math  Level 1: Addition
(A) 2 Player Math Game
(A) Addition Dartboard

(A,B) Space Shuttle Launch
(B) Add 'Em Up
(B) Take It Away
(B) Save the Apples
(B) Space Shuttle Launch
(B) Tunnel Blaster - add
(B) Snakes and Ladders
(B) Math Fries
(B) Speed Math
(B) Buffalo Math
(B) Fridge Magnets Addition
(B)  Fridge Magnets Subtraction
(B) Jet Ski Addition

(B) Island Chase Subtraction
(B) Amoeba Addition Game

(B) Bargain Hunt Addition
(B) Conveyer Belt Subtraction

Interactive Teacher
(A,B) Adding Real Numbers

(3.4)Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student recognizes and solves problems in multiplication and division situations. 

(A) learn and apply multiplication facts through the tens using concrete models; 
(B) solve and record multiplication problems (one- digit multiplier); and 
(C) use models to solve division problems and use number sentences to record the solutions. 

Interactive Student 
(A) Basic Facts Practice
(A) Numbers
(A) Meteor Multiplication

(A) Space Shuttle Launch
(A)(B) Flashcards
(A, B) Tug of War
(B) Farm Stand
(B) Batter's Up Baseball 
(B) Lemonade Larry
(B) Multiflyer
(B) Tunnel Blaster - Multiply
(B) Baseball Multiplication
(B) Tackle Math Ball

(B) Fridge Magnets Multiplication
(B) Meteor Multiplication
(B) Multiplication Flashcards
(B) Cone Crazy
(B)  Grand Prix Multiplication

(B) Bouncing Balls Multiplication
(C) Drag Race Division
(C) Demolition Division

Interactive Teacher
(A) Multiplication Tables

(A) Ann and Addem's dartboard game

(3.5)Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student estimates to determine reasonable results.

(A) round two-digit numbers to the nearest ten and three-digit numbers to the nearest hundred; and 
(B) estimate sums and differences beyond basic facts. 

Interactive Student
(A) Rounding to nearest 10
(A) Rounding to nearest 100
(A) Half Court Rounding
(B) Math Golf

Interactive Teacher

(B) Front End Estimation (Subtraction)

(B) Front End Estimation (Addition)

(3.6)Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses patterns to solve problems. 

(A) identify and extend whole-number and geometric patterns to make predictions and solve problems; 
(B) identify patterns in multiplication facts using concrete objects, pictorial models, or technology; and 
(C) identify patterns in related multiplication and division sentences (fact families) such as 2 x 3 = 6, 3 x 2 = 6, 6 ÷ 2 = 3, 6 ÷ 3 = 2. 

Interactive Student 
(C) Multiplication Mystery

Interactive Teacher

(3.7)Patterns, relationships, and algebraic thinking. The student uses lists, tables, and charts to express patterns and relationships. 

(A) generate a table of paired numbers based on a real-life situation such as insects and legs; and 
(B) identify patterns in a table of related number pairs based on a real-life situation and extend the table. 

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher
(A, B) Music for Movies

(3.8) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student uses formal geometric vocabulary.

The student is expected to name, describe, and compare shapes and solids using formal geometric vocabulary. 

Interactive Student
Shapes
Geo-Matho
Shape Invaders

Interactive Teacher
Geometric Vocabulary

(3.9)Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student recognizes congruence and symmetry.

(A) identify congruent shapes; 
(B) create shapes with lines of symmetry using concrete models and technology; and 
(C) identify lines of symmetry in shapes. 

Interactive Student
(A) 3-D Lab 
(A) Congruent Triangles
(A)(C) Virtual Manipulative: Reflection

(B,C) Tessalate!

Interactive Teacher

(3.10) Geometry and spatial reasoning. The student recognizes that numbers can be represented by points on a line.

The student is expected to locate and name points on a line using whole numbers and fractions such as halves. 

Interactive Student
Find Grampy
Identify Fractions

Interactive Teacher
Number lines
Real Number Line

(3.11) Measurement. The student selects and uses appropriate units and procedures to measure length and area. 

(A) estimate and measure lengths using standard units such as inch, foot, yard, centimeter, decimeter, and meter; 
(B) use linear measure to find the perimeter of a shape; and 
(C) use concrete models of square units to determine the area of shapes. 

Interactive Student
(A) Fish Tales
(A) Animal Weigh-In
(A)  Measuring inches
(B)  Calculating Perimeter
(B) Adam Ant
(B) Zoo Designer
(B,C) Area Explorer
 

Interactive Teacher

(3.12) Measurement. The student measures time and temperature. 

(A) tell and write time shown on traditional and digital clocks; and 
(B) use a thermometer to measure temperature. 

Interactive Student 
(A) Matching Game 
(A) Smiley Clock
(A) What Time?
(A) Stop the Clock
(A) What Time Is It?
(A) Bedtime Bandits (uses arrow keys and spacebar)
(A) Telling the Time
(A) Clock Wise

(A) Mouse Ran up the Clock
(A) Telling Time Practice

Interactive Teacher
(A) Time Flies
(A) Teaching Time Clock
 

(3.13) Measurement. The student applies measurement concepts.

The student is expected to measure to solve problems involving length, area, temperature, and time. 

Interactive Student
(A) Time order

Interactive Teacher
(A) Sleuths on the Loose

(3.14) Probability and statistics. The student solves problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting sets of data.

(A) collect, organize, record, and display data in pictographs and bar graphs where each picture or cell might represent more than one piece of data; 
(B) interpret information from pictographs and bar graphs; and 
(C) use data to describe events as more likely, less likely, or equally likely. 

Interactive Student
(A,B) Hairy Chart
(A) Line Graph Generator
(B) Interpreting Data
(A) Bar Graph Generator
(A) Data Grapher

Interactive Teacher
(A) Kids Graphing Page

(3.15) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student applies Grade 3 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences and activities in and outside of school. 

(A) identify the mathematics in everyday situations; 
(B) use a problem-solving model that incorporates understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness; 
(C) select or develop an appropriate problem- solving strategy, including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking, acting it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working backwards to solve a problem; and 
(D) use tools such as real objects, manipulatives, and technology to solve problems. 

Interactive Student
(A) Word Problem Baseball
(A) Tens of Word Problems
(B) Lemonade Game
(D) Fox, Chicken, Corn
(A,B,C,D,) Grand Slam Math
(C) Katie and Aldo

Interactive Teacher

(D) Interactive Abacus

(3.16) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student communicates about Grade 3 mathematics using informal language.

(A) explain and record observations using objects, words, pictures, numbers, and technology; and 
(B) relate informal language to mathematical language and symbols. 

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher
Math Glossary 

(3.17) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student uses logical reasoning to make sense of his or her world.

(A) make generalizations from patterns or sets of examples and non-examples; and 
(B) justify why an answer is reasonable and explain the solution process. 

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

Science - Starting in school year 2010-2011

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(1) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student conducts classroom and outdoor investigations following school and home safety procedures and environmentally appropriate practices. The student is expected to: (A) demonstrate safe practices as described in the Texas Safety Standards during classroom and outdoor investigations, including observing a schoolyard habitat; and
(B) make informed choices in the use and conservation of natural resources by recycling or reusing materials such as paper, aluminum cans, and plastics.
Interactive Student
(B) Clean up the Park
(B) Earth Day
(B) Recycling Activities
 
(2) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses scientific inquiry methods during laboratory and outdoor investigations. The student is expected to: (A) plan and implement descriptive investigations, including asking and answering questions, making inferences, and selecting and using equipment or technology needed, to solve a specific problem in the natural world;
(B) collect data by observing and measuring using the metric system and recognize differences between observed and measured data;
(C) construct maps, graphic organizers, simple tables, charts, and bar graphs using tools and current technology to organize, examine, and evaluate measured data;
(D) analyze and interpret patterns in data to construct reasonable explanations based on evidence from investigations;
(E) demonstrate that repeated investigations may increase the reliability of results; and
(F) communicate valid conclusions supported by data in writing, by drawing pictures, and through verbal discussion.
   
(3) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows that information, critical thinking, scientific problem solving, and the contributions of scientists are used in making decisions. The student is expected to: (A) in all fields of science, analyze, evaluate, and critique scientific explanations by using empirical evidence, logical reasoning, and experimental and observational testing, including examining all sides of scientific evidence of those scientific explanations, so as to encourage critical thinking by the student;
(B) draw inferences and evaluate accuracy of product claims found in advertisements and labels such as for toys and food;
(C) represent the natural world using models such as volcanoes or Sun, Earth, and Moon system and identify their limitations, including size, properties, and materials; and
(D) connect grade-level appropriate science concepts with the history of science, science careers, and contributions of scientists.
Interactive Student
(E) Kids Graphing Page
(E) Pie Chart
(E) Hairy Chart
(E) Max's Challenge
 
(4) Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows how to use a variety of tools and methods to conduct science inquiry. The student is expected to: (A) collect, record, and analyze information using tools, including microscopes, cameras, computers, hand lenses, metric rulers, Celsius thermometers, wind vanes, rain gauges, pan balances, graduated cylinders, beakers, spring scales, hot plates, meter sticks, compasses, magnets, collecting nets, notebooks, sound recorders, and Sun, Earth, and Moon system models; timing devices, including clocks and stopwatches; and materials to support observation of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums; and
(B) use safety equipment as appropriate, including safety goggles and gloves.
   
(5) Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has measurable physical properties and those properties determine how matter is classified, changed, and used. The student is expected to: (A) measure, test, and record physical properties of matter, including temperature, mass, magnetism, and the ability to sink or float;
(B) describe and classify samples of matter as solids, liquids, and gases and demonstrate that solids have a definite shape and that liquids and gases take the shape of their container;
(C) predict, observe, and record changes in the state of matter caused by heating or cooling; and
(D) explore and recognize that a mixture is created when two materials are combined such as gravel and sand and metal and plastic paper clips.
Interactive Student
(B) Changing State
Interactive Teacher
(B) States of Matter
(B) Solid, Gas, Liquids
(B) Solids, Gas, Liquids Study Jam
(C) Virtual Experiments
(6) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that forces cause change and that energy exists in many forms. The student is expected to: (A) explore different forms of energy, including mechanical, light, sound, and heat/thermal in everyday life;
(B) demonstrate and observe how position and motion can be changed by pushing and pulling objects to show work being done such as swings, balls, pulleys, and wagons; and
(C) observe forces such as magnetism and gravity acting on objects.
Interactive Student
(B,C) Kinetic Energy Lab 
(B,C) Friction
(A,B) Forces in Action
(B) The compound machine
 
(7) Earth and space. The student knows that Earth consists of natural resources and its surface is constantly changing. The student is expected to: (A) explore and record how soils are formed by weathering of rock and the decomposition of plant and animal remains;
(B) investigate rapid changes in Earth's surface such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and landslides;
(C) identify and compare different landforms, including mountains, hills, valleys, and plains; and
(D) explore the characteristics of natural resources that make them useful in products and materials such as clothing and furniture and how resources may be conserved.

Interactive Student
 

Interactive Teacher
(A) Rock Cycle
(C) Land Forms
(8) Earth and space. The student knows there are recognizable patterns in the natural world and among objects in the sky. The student is expected to: (A) observe, measure, record, and compare day-to-day weather changes in different locations at the same time that include air temperature, wind direction, and precipitation;
(B) describe and illustrate the Sun as a star composed of gases that provides light and heat energy for the water cycle;
(C) construct models that demonstrate the relationship of the Sun, Earth, and Moon, including orbits and positions; and
(D) identify the planets in Earth's solar system and their position in relation to the Sun.

(A) Weather Detective
(A) Weather Maker

(C) Earth, Sun, Moon
(C,D) Earth Science Quiz
(C,D) Quiz Games
(C,D) Where does the Planet Go?

(C,D) Solar System Card Shuffle
(C,D) Planet Tic-Tac-Toe
(D) Planet Flip-Flop
(D) Catch a Planet

 
 
(9) Organisms and environments. The student knows that organisms have characteristics that help them survive and can describe patterns, cycles, systems, and relationships within the environments. The student is expected to: (A) observe and describe the physical characteristics of environments and how they support populations and communities within an ecosystem;
(B) identify and describe the flow of energy in a food chain and predict how changes in a food chain affect the ecosystem such as removal of frogs from a pond or bees from a field; and
(C) describe environmental changes such as floods and droughts where some organisms thrive and others perish or move to new locations.
Interactive Student
(A) Match the Habitat
(A) Animals in their Environment1
(A) Animals in their Environment2
(A) Animal Habitats
(A, B) Animals of the World
(A) Habitats
(A) Build an online habitat
(A,B) Food Chain
(A) Quest to Nest
Interactive Teacher
(A) Fantastic Forest
(10) Organisms and environments. The student knows that organisms undergo similar life processes and have structures that help them survive within their environments. The student is expected to: (A) explore how structures and functions of plants and animals allow them to survive in a particular environment;
(B) explore that some characteristics of organisms are inherited such as the number of limbs on an animal or flower color and recognize that some behaviors are learned in response to living in a certain environment such as animals using tools to get food; and
(C) investigate and compare how animals and plants undergo a series of orderly changes in their diverse life cycles such as tomato plants, frogs, and lady bugs.
Interactive Student
(A,B) Crunch, Nibble, Gulp, Bite
(B) Animal Feet
(B) Animal Ears
(B) Inherited Traits Form
 

Language Arts

(1)  Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students are expected to:

 

(A)  decode multisyllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common spelling patterns including:
(i)  dropping the final "e" and add endings such as -ing, -ed, or -able (e.g., use, using, used, usable);
(ii)  doubling final consonants when adding an ending (e.g., hop to hopping);
(iii)  changing the final "y" to "i" (e.g., baby to babies);
(iv)  using knowledge of common prefixes and suffixes (e.g., dis-, -ly); and
(v)  using knowledge of derivational affixes (e.g., -de, -ful, -able);
(B)  use common syllabication patterns to decode words including:
(i)  closed syllable (CVC) (e.g., mag-net, splen-did);
(ii)  open syllable (CV) (e.g., ve-to);
(iii)  final stable syllable (e.g., puz-zle, con-trac-tion);
(iv)  r-controlled vowels (e.g., fer-ment, car-pool); and
(v)  vowel digraphs and diphthongs (e.g., ei-ther)
(C)  decode words applying knowledge of common spelling patterns (e.g., -eigh, -ought);
(D)  identify and read contractions (e.g., I'd, won't); and
(E)  monitor accuracy in decoding.

Interactive Student

(A) See 'N Spell: Blends

(B) Learn to Read

(B) See 'N Spell: Short Vowels
(B) See 'N Spell: Long Vowels
(B) See 'N Spell: More Vowels

Interactive Teacher

(2)  Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:

(A)  use ideas (e.g., illustrations, titles, topic sentences, key words, and foreshadowing clues) to make and confirm predictions;
(B)  ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text; and
(C)  establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).

Interactive Student|
(C) Reading Comprehension

Interactive Teacher

(A) Making Predictions

(3)  Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to read aloud grade-level appropriate text with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

 

 

Interactive Student

 

(4)  Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:

(A)  identify the meaning of common prefixes (e.g., in-, dis-) and suffixes (e.g., -full, -less), and know how they change the meaning of roots;
(B)  use context to determine the relevant meaning of unfamiliar words or distinguish among multiple meaning words and homographs;
(C)  identify and use antonyms, synonyms, homographs, and homophones;
(D)  identify and apply playful uses of language (e.g., tongue twisters, palindromes, riddles); and
(E)  alphabetize a series of words to the third letter and use a dictionary or a glossary to determine the meanings, syllabication, and pronunciation of unknown words.

 

Interactive Student

(C) Word Frog
(C) Ball hogs
(C) Antonyms
(C) Synonyms - Code Calling
(C) Squanky

(C) Tossed up Talents

(C) Homophones
(C) Word Frog
(C) Furious Frogs (multi-player)
(C) Synonym Sam's Lab

(E) Alphabet Game
(E) Alphabet Organizer
(E) Dictionary Designer

(E) Lesson Plan for Alphabet Organizer

(5)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories; and
(B)  compare and contrast the settings in myths and traditional folktales.

Interactive Student 
(A) Myths and Legends

 

(6)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to describe the characteristics of various forms of poetry and how they create imagery (e.g., narrative poetry, lyrical poetry, humorous poetry, free verse).

 

Interactive Student

 

(7)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Drama. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the elements of plot and character as presented through dialogue in scripts that are read, viewed, written, or performed.

 

Interactive Student

 

(8)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(A)  sequence and summarize the plot's main events and explain their influence on future events;
(B)  describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo; and
(C)  identify whether the narrator or speaker of a story is first or third person.

Interactive Student

(A) Story Scramble

Interactive Teacher

(9)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to explain the difference in point of view between a biography and autobiography.

 

Interactive Student

RainForest Identification

Interactive Teacher

(10)  Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author's sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify language that creates a graphic visual experience and appeals to the senses.

 

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(11)  Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading. Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to read independently for a sustained period of time and paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g., generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks).

 

Interactive Student

 Interactive Teacher

(12)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to identify the topic and locate the author's stated purposes in writing the text.

 

Interactive Student

What can you infer?

 

(13)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: 

(A)  identify the details or facts that support the main idea;
(B)  draw conclusions from the facts presented in text and support those assertions with textual evidence;
(C)  identify explicit cause and effect relationships among ideas in texts; and
(D)  use text features (e.g., bold print, captions, key words, italics) to locate information and make and verify predictions about contents of text.

Interactive Student

(B) Draw Conclusions: The Test Tutor

(B) Draw Conclusions: The Test Tutor

(B) Drawing Conclusions

(B) Drawing Conclusions

(B) Supporting Details

(C) Cause and Effect

(C) Cause and Effect

(C) Cause and Effect

(C) Cause and Effect

 

(14)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Persuasive Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students are expected to identify what the author is trying to persuade the reader to think or do.

 

Interactive Student

 

(15)  Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow and explain a set of written multi-step directions; and
(B)  locate and use specific information in graphic features of text.

 

Interactive Student 

 

(16)  Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:

(A)  understand how communication changes when moving from one genre of media to another;
(B)  explain how various design techniques used in media influence the message (e.g., shape, color, sound); and
(C)  compare various written conventions used for digital media (e.g., language in an informal e-mail vs. language in a web-based news article).

 

Interactive Student
 

 

(17)  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:

(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience and generating ideas through a range of strategies (e.g., brainstorming, graphic organizers, logs, journals);
(B)  develop drafts by categorizing ideas and organizing them into paragraphs;
(C)  revise drafts for coherence, organization, use of simple and compound sentences, and audience;
(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric; and
(E)  publish written work for a specific audience

Interactive Student

(A) 3 Circles

(A) Animal Inquiry
(C) Is this a compound sentence?

(D) Sentence Clubhouse


(A) Venn Diagram
(A) Lesson Plan for Animal Inquiry

(18)  Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:

(A)  write imaginative stories that build the plot to a climax and contain details about the characters and setting; and
(B)  write poems that convey sensory details using the conventions of poetry (e.g., rhyme, meter, patterns of verse).

Interactive Student

(A) Story Starter

(A) Bio Cube
(A) Story Creator

(B) Shape Poem

(A) Lesson Plan for Bio Cube

(19)  Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write about important personal experiences.

 

Interactive Student

 

(20)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

(A)  create brief compositions that:
(i)  establish a central idea in a topic sentence;
(ii)  include supporting sentences with simple facts, details, and explanations; and
(iii)  contain a concluding statement;
(B)  write letters whose language is tailored to the audience and purpose (e.g., a thank you note to a friend) and that use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing); and
(C)  write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate an understanding of the text.

Interactive Student

(A)(B)(C) Writer's Block - Writing On Topic 

 

(21)  Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write persuasive essays for appropriate audiences that establish a position and use supporting details.

 

Interactive Student

 

(22)  Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
(i)  verbs (past, present, and future);
(ii)  nouns (singular/plural, common/proper);
(iii)  adjectives (e.g., descriptive: wooden, rectangular; limiting: this, that; articles: a, an, the);
(iv)  adverbs (e.g., time: before, next; manner: carefully, beautifully);
(v)  prepositions and prepositional phrases;
(vi)  possessive pronouns (e.g., his, hers, theirs);
(vii)  coordinating conjunctions (e.g., and, or, but); and
(viii)  time-order transition words and transitions that indicate a conclusion;
(B)  use the complete subject and the complete predicate in a sentence; and
(C)  use complete simple and compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.

Interactive Student

(A) Wacky Tales

(A) Mad Libs

(A.i) See 'N Spell: Plurals

(A.i)English Verbs

(A.i)  Plural Noun Construction

(A.i) Pick the Perfect Word

(A.i) Monster Truck Verbs

(A.i) (A.ii) Clean up Your Grammar

(A.ii) Plural Play

(A.vi) Pronoun Reef 

(A.vii) Pronouns
(A vvi) Ballloon Joining Words
(B) Make a Sentence

(C) Subject-Verb Mixup

Interactive Teacher

(23)  Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:

(A)  write legibly in cursive script with spacing between words in a sentence;
(B)  use capitalization for:
(i)  geographical names and places;
(ii)  historical periods; and
(iii)  official titles of people;
(C)  recognize and use punctuation marks including:
(i)  apostrophes in contractions and possessives; and
(ii)  commas in series and dates; and
(D)  use correct mechanics including paragraph indentations.

Interactive Student

(C) Missing Goblet
(Ci) Beat the Clock - Apostrophes

(C.ii.) Comma Confusion
(Cii) Going to work on commas
(C) Blown Away game

 

(24)  Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:

(A)  use knowledge of letter sounds, word parts, word segmentation, and syllabication to spell;
(B)  spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules:
(i)  consonant doubling when adding an ending;
(ii)  dropping final "e" when endings are added (e.g., -ing, -ed);
(iii)  changing y to i before adding an ending;
(iv)  double consonants in middle of words;
(v)  complex consonants (e.g., scr-, -dge, -tch); and
(vi)  abstract vowels (e.g., ou as in could, touch, through, bought);
(C)  spell high-frequency and compound words from a commonly used list;
(D)  spell words with common syllable constructions (e.g., closed, open, final stable syllable);
(E)  spell single syllable homophones (e.g., bear/bare; week/weak; road/rode);
(F)  spell complex contractions (e.g., should've, won't); and
(G)  use print and electronic resources to find and check correct spellings.

Interactive Student

(B) See 'N Spell: Plurals
(B) Plural nouns

(B.ii) Plural Play 

(B.ii) (B.iii) Fish'em Up

(B.vi.) Coconut Vowels

(E) To/Two/Too

(E) Pair Words Game

(F) Contractions
(F) Contractions
(F) Contractions

(G) Pick a Word

 

(25)  Research/Research Plan. Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students are expected to:

(A)  generate research topics from personal interests or by brainstorming with others, narrow to one topic, and formulate open-ended questions about the major research topic; and
(B)  generate a research plan for gathering relevant information (e.g., surveys, interviews, encyclopedias) about the major research question.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(26)  Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:

(A)  follow the research plan to collect information from multiple sources of information, both oral and written, including:
(i)  student-initiated surveys, on-site inspections, and interviews;
(ii)  data from experts, reference texts, and online searches; and
(iii)  visual sources of information (e.g., maps, timelines, graphs) where appropriate;
(B)  use skimming and scanning techniques to identify data by looking at text features (e.g., bold print, captions, key words, italics);
(C)  take simple notes and sort evidence into provided categories or an organizer;
(D)  identify the author, title, publisher, and publication year of sources; and
(E)  differentiate between paraphrasing and plagiarism and identify the importance of citing valid and reliable sources.

(A) Using a Variety of Sources
(A) Research Sources
(A) What is an encyclopedia?
 

(27)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to improve the focus of research as a result of consulting expert sources (e.g., reference librarians and local experts on the topic)

 
   

(28)  Research/Organizing and Presenting Ideas. Students organize and present their ideas and information according to the purpose of the research and their audience. Students are expected to draw conclusions through a brief written explanation and create a works-cited page from notes, including the author, title, publisher, and publication year for each source used.

 
   

(29)  Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:

(A)  listen attentively to speakers, ask relevant questions, and make pertinent comments; and
(B)  follow, restate, and give oral instructions that involve a series of related sequences of action.

 

   

(30)  Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to speak coherently about the topic under discussion, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, and the conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

 
   

(31)  Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in teacher- and student-led discussions by posing and answering questions with appropriate detail and by providing suggestions that build upon the ideas of others.

 
   

Social Studies

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(1)  History. The student understands how individuals, events, and ideas have influenced the history of various communities.

(A)  describe how individuals, events, and ideas have changed communities over time;
(B)  identify individuals such as Pierre-Charles L'Enfant who have helped to shape communities; and
(C)  describe how individuals such as Christopher Columbus and Meriwether Lewis and William Clark have contributed to the expansion of existing communities or to the creation of new communities.

Interactive Student

(C) Go West Across America with Lewis and Clark
(C) Christopher Columbus

Interactive Teacher

(2)  History. The student understands common characteristics of communities, past and present.

(A)  identify reasons people have formed communities, including a need for security, law, and material well-being; and
(B)  compare ways in which people in the local community and communities around the world meet their needs for government, education, communication, transportation, and recreation, over time and in the present.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(3)  History. The student understands the concepts of time and chronology.

(A)  use vocabulary related to chronology, including ancient and modern times and past, present, and future times;
(B)  create and interpret timelines; and
(C)  describe historical times in terms of years, decades, and centuries.

Interactive Student
(B) Interactive Timeline

Interactive Teacher

(A,B,C) Growth of a Nation Animated Atlas

(4)  Geography. The student understands how humans adapt to variations in the physical environment.

(A)  describe and explain variations in the physical environment including climate, landforms, natural resources, and natural hazards;
(B)  compare how people in different communities adapt to or modify the physical environment;
(C)  describe the effects of physical and human processes in shaping the landscape; and
(D)  identify and compare the human characteristics of selected regions.

Interactive Student
(A) Coastal Features Jigsaw
(A) Coastal Features
(A) Rivers Jigsaw
(A) Types of Landforms
(C) That Dam Effect

Interactive Teacher
(A) World Landforms

(5)  Geography. The student understands the concepts of location, distance, and direction on maps and globes.

(A)  use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places such as the Amazon River, Himalayan Mountains, and Washington D.C. on maps and globes;
(B)  use a scale to determine the distance between places on maps and globes;
(C)  identify and use the compass rose, grid, and symbols to locate places on maps and globes; and
(D)  draw maps of places and regions that contain map elements including a title, compass rose, legend, scale, and grid system.

Interactive Student
(C) Landscapes
(C) Compass Rose
(C) USA States

Interactive Teacher

(6)  Economics. The student understands the purposes of spending and saving money.

(A)  identify ways of earning, spending, and saving money; and
(B)  analyze a simple budget that allocates money for spending and saving.

Interactive Student

(A) (B) Lemonade Stand

Interactive Teacher

(7)  Economics. The student understands the concept of an economic system.

(A)  define and identify examples of scarcity;
(B)  explain the impact of scarcity on the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services;
(C)  explain the impact of scarcity on interdependence within and among communities; and
(D)  explain the concept of a free market.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher
(B) Goods and Services  (click on visit site)

(8)  Economics. The student understands how businesses operate in the U.S. free enterprise system.

(A)  give examples of how a simple business operates;
(B)  explain how supply and demand affect the price of a good or service;
(C)  explain how the cost of production and selling price affect profits; and
(D)  identify historic figures, such as Henry Ford, and ordinary people in the community who have started new businesses.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(A) Free Enterprise
(B) Supply and Demand

(9)  Government. The student understands the basic structure and functions of local government.

(A)  describe the basic structure of government in the local community;
(B)  identify services commonly provided by local governments;
(C)  identify local government officials and explain how they are chosen;
(D)  explain how local government services are financed; and
(E)  explain the importance of the consent of the governed to the functions of local government.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(10)  Citizenship. The student understands characteristics of good citizenship as exemplified by historic figures and ordinary people.

(A)  identify characteristics of good citizenship such as a belief in justice, truth, equality, and responsibility for the common good;
(B)  identify historic figures such as Jane Addams, Helen Keller, and Harriet Tubman who have exemplified good citizenship;
(C)  identify and explain the importance of acts of civic responsibility, including obeying laws and voting; and
(D)  identify ordinary people who exemplify good citizenship.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(11)  Citizenship. The student understands the impact of individual and group decisions on communities in a democratic society.

(A)  give examples of community changes that result from individual or group decisions;
(B)  identify examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community; and
(C)  identify examples of nonprofit and/or civic organizations such as the Red Cross and explain how they serve the common good.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(12)  Culture. The student understands ethnic and/or cultural celebrations of the United States and other nations.

(A)  explain the significance of selected ethnic and/or cultural celebrations in Texas, the United States, and other nations such as St. Patrick's Day, Cinco de Mayo, and Kwanzaa; and
(B)  compare ethnic and/or cultural celebrations in Texas, the United States, and other nations.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(13)  Culture. The student understands the role of real and mythical heroes in shaping the culture of communities, the state, and the nation.

(A)  identify the heroic deeds of state and national heroes such as Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett;
(B)  retell the heroic deeds of characters from American folktales and legends such as Pecos Bill and Paul Bunyan;
(C)  retell the heroic deeds of characters of Greek and Roman myths; and
(D)  identify how selected fictional characters such as Robinson Crusoe created new communities.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(14)  Culture. The student understands the importance of writers and artists to the cultural heritage of communities.

(A)  identify selected individual writers and artists and their stories, poems, statues, paintings, and other examples of cultural heritage from communities around the world; and
(B)  explain the significance of selected individual writers and artists and their stories, poems, statues, paintings, and other examples of cultural heritage to communities around the world.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(15)  Science, technology, and society. The student understands how individuals have created or invented new technology and affected life in communities around the world, past and present.

(A)  identify scientists and inventors such as Louis Daguerre, Cyrus McCormick, Louis Pasteur, and Jonas Salk who have created or invented new technology; and
(B)  identify the impact of new technology in photography, farm equipment, pasteurization, and medical vaccines on communities around the world.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(16)  Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of sources including electronic technology.

(A)  obtain information, including historical and geographic data about the community, using a variety of print, oral, visual, and computer sources;
(B)  sequence and categorize information;
(C)  interpret oral, visual, and print material by identifying the main idea, identifying cause and effect, and comparing and contrasting;
(D)  use various parts of a source, including the table of contents, glossary, and index, as well as keyword computer searches, to locate information;
(E)  interpret and create visuals including graphs, charts, tables, timelines, illustrations, and maps; and
(F)  use appropriate mathematical skills to interpret social studies information such as maps and graphs.

Interactive Student

(B) What's the order?

Interactive Teacher

(17)  Social studies skills. The student communicates effectively in written, oral, and visual forms.

(A)  express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences;
(B)  create written and visual material such as stories, poems, pictures, maps, and graphic organizers to express ideas; and
(C)  use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.

Interactive Student
(B) Animal Inquiry

Interactive Teacher
(B)  Lesson Plan for Animal Inquiry

(18)  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others, in a variety of settings.

(A)  use a problem-solving process to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution; and
(B)  use a decision-making process to identify a situation that requires a decision, gather information, identify options, predict consequences, and take action to implement a decision.

Fine Arts
Art | Music | Theatre

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Art

(1)  Perception. The student develops and organizes ideas from the environment.

(A)  identify sensory knowledge and life experiences as sources for ideas about visual symbols, self, and life events; and
(B)  identify art elements such as color, texture, form, line, space, and value and art principles such as emphasis, pattern, rhythm, balance, proportion, and unity in artworks.

Interactive Student

(B) Color - Primary & Secondary
(B) Color - Warm and Cool
(B) Color - Complimentary
(B) Shape
(B) Lines
(B) Space - Depth
(B) Space - Positive & Negative
(B) Space - Perspective
(B) Rhythm
(B) Balance

Interactive Teacher

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student expresses ideas through original artworks, using a variety of media with appropriate skill.

(A)  create artworks based on personal observations and experiences;
(B)  develop a variety of effective compositions, using design skills; and
(C)  produce drawings, paintings, prints, constructions, ceramics, and fiberart, using a variety of art materials appropriately.

Interactive Student
(C) The Art Zone

Interactive Teacher

(3)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture as records of human achievement.

(A)  compare content in artworks from the past and present for various purposes such as telling stories and documenting history and traditions;
(B)  compare selected artworks from different cultures; and
(C)  relate art to different kinds of jobs in everyday life.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(4)  Response/evaluation. The student makes informed judgments about personal artworks and the artworks of others.

(A)  identify general intent and expressive qualities in personal artworks; and
(B)  apply simple criteria to identify main ideas in original artworks, portfolios, and exhibitions by peers and major artists.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

Music

(1)  Perception. The student describes and analyzes musical sound and demonstrates musical artistry.

(A)  categorize a variety of musical sounds, including children's and adults' voices; woodwind, brass, string, percussion, keyboard, and electronic instruments; and instruments from various cultures;
(B)  use music terminology in explaining sound, music, music notation, musical instruments and voices, and musical performances; and
(C)  identify music forms presented aurally such as AB, ABA, and rondo.

Interactive Student

(A) Instruments of the Orchestra

Interactive Teacher

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student performs a varied repertoire of music.

(A)  sing or play a classroom instrument independently or in groups; and
(B)  sing songs from diverse cultures and styles or play such songs on a musical instrument.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student reads and writes music notation.

(A)  read music notation, using a system (letters, numbers, syllables);
(B)  write music notation, using a system (letters, numbers, syllables);
(C)  read and write music that incorporates basic rhythmic patterns in simple meters; and
(D)  identify music symbols and terms referring to dynamics and tempo.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(4)  Creative expression/performance. The student creates and arranges music within specified guidelines.

(A)  create rhythmic phrases; and
(B)  create melodic phrases.

Interactive Student

(A) Counting Music

Interactive Teacher

(5)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates music to history, to society, and to culture.

(A)  identify aurally-presented excerpts of music representing diverse genres, styles, periods, and cultures;
(B)  perform songs and musical games from diverse cultures; and
(C)  describe relationships between music and other subjects.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(6)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates music and musical performance.

(A)  define basic criteria for evaluating musical performances; and
(B)  exhibit audience etiquette during live performances.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

Theatre

(1)  Perception. The student develops concepts about self, human relationships, and the environment, using elements of drama and conventions of theatre.

(A)  react to sensory and emotional experiences;
(B)  create playing space, using expressive and rhythmic movement;
(C)  respond to sound, music, images, and the written word with voice and movement and participate in dramatic play, using actions, sounds, and dialogue; and
(D)  reflect the environment, portray character, and demonstrate actions in classroom dramatizations.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(2)  Creative expression/performance. The student interprets characters, using the voice and body expressively, and creates dramatizations.

(A)  demonstrate safe use of movement and voice;
(B)  participate in a variety of roles in real life and imaginative situations through narrative pantomime, dramatic play, and story dramatization;
(C)  dramatize literary selections, using shadow play and puppetry; and
(D)  dramatize literary selections, using pantomime and imitative dialogue.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(3)  Creative expression/performance. The student applies design, directing, and theatre production concepts and skills.

(A)  identify technical theatre elements;
(B)  begin to use simple technical theatre elements;
(C)  plan dramatic play; and
(D)  cooperate and interact with others in dramatic play.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(4)  Historical/cultural heritage. The student relates theatre to history, society, and culture.

(A)  illustrate similarities and differences in life and theatre through dramatic play; and
(B)  reflect historical and diverse cultural influences in dramatic activities.

Interactive Student

Interactive Teacher

(5)  Response/evaluation. The student responds to and evaluates theatre and theatrical performances.

(A)  evaluate and apply appropriate audience behavior consistently;
(B)  evaluate simple dramatic activities and performances;
(C)  incorporate music, movement, and visual components in dramatic play; and
(D)  observe the performance of amateur and professional artists and begin to compare vocations in theatre.

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updated 02/06/2012